Fukushima: human implications

Source: Fukushima: human implications

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18 comments

  1. larryzb · April 7

    Fukushima was very bad, indeed. Nuclear power is inherently dangerous and allows for no human error.

    Liked by 2 people

    • vikinglifeblog · April 7

      I agree! It’s kind of uncomfortable to think of.

      Like

    • ᛋᛉᚺ|ᛟᚾ · April 8

      Larry, it also is important that we maintain the responsibility of warding such a dangerous technology, hence all technical trades required for maintenance are pertinent to keeping alive in dream and mission if we want eventual shut down(phasing out), which I believe is the enlightened European approach. However long it takes even 100 years from now, yet the Pandora’s box is open, as ugly as atomic fission may be it should be treated as a stepping stone for better systems, big problems beg to question bigger solutions.

      Tom, one of the contributing factors the meltdown at Fukushima was Oriental Passiveness, the Japanese engineers knew there was technical flaws in the Reactor design but due to their ingrained mentality of keeping their head down and not rocking the boat they kept their lips sealed. As for the reactor cores they were of American(General Electric) origin provided to Japan an island prone to Earthquakes and sinking, not only that but the design did not permit emergency repair in the event of an internal core containment fracture under the assumption that “It was a one in a million chance” which in fact did happen and now we all can see the end result of that.

      Liked by 1 person

      • vikinglifeblog · April 8

        Yes, I feel better about surden countries having nuclear power than others.
        Sweden have a nuclear power plant about 20 km from Copenhagen on the cost (visible from Copenhagen), in a country that is about 1200 km long (not cool). A lot of former Warsaw Pact countries still have their old Chernobyl style reactors in use.
        My opinions (not that I have much on nuclear power) might be colored by growing up in a country that only studied nuclear power and never used it. As I understand it, Denmark is also a leading country in filtering exhaust from coal power and waist burning plants.

        Liked by 1 person

      • ᛋᛉᚺ|ᛟᚾ · April 8

        I grew up in the Midwest U.S. very sparsely populated and free of Nuclear power however dependent upon Methane, Oil and Coal power, with the exception of Nuclear power. Fun story, I grew up next to the “U.S. Department of Energy Bannister Complex” which at one time was responsible for producing Nuclear warheads for I.C.B.M.s which at the time silos were dotted around Missouri and Kansas before being relocated to Wyoming and Idaho. However I later learned that the remaining nuclear warheads which were not moved were in fact stored at the very complex. In 1989 The Department of energy showed up on our doorstep in NBC suits and Geiger dosimeters because apparently the our Suburban culdesac was part of the their Nuclear storage facility 2 miles deep underground and they wanted to check for leaks in containment. I later learned that over 400 employees died from Leukemia at that very plant between the late 1940s-present.

        Like

      • vikinglifeblog · April 8
      • ᛋᛉᚺ|ᛟᚾ · April 8

        Oh wow, Niels Bohr founded the Risø Foundation that is very impressive considering that he is the true father of Physics ignored by the mainstream and superior in all ways to that jewish charlatan (((Albert Einstein)))

        Like

      • vikinglifeblog · April 8

        Oh, yes. USA definitely have a few skeletons in the closet. Interesting story. I thought, that they did all that in places like New Mexico and Nevada. When I think of Missouri, Kansas, Wyoming and Idaho, I think of farm land. The breadbasket of USA.

        Liked by 1 person

      • ᛋᛉᚺ|ᛟᚾ · April 8

        You are mostly correct, The Deparment of Energy Los Alamos in Nevada is the largest and most sophisticated of such complexes the Bannister complex pales in comparison. The film “The Day After” was actually made to protest the silos which lead to the move of I.C.B.M. sites. My father made it an annual event that everyone watch that film and even said to me your generation will witness an atomic explosion on U.S. soil a bit crazy considering that my retinas would be burned if that happened and I probably wouldn’t be alive to recall it. Yet it is not unfounded considering the reality of our world which shapes such perceptions.

        Liked by 1 person

      • vikinglifeblog · April 8

        Niels Bohr is half jewish and half danish, actually he is 100% jewish because of his mother.
        I think, that he was there mostly because he was famous. There was a number of danes who founded it, like professor J.C. Jacobsen, professor Torkild Bjerge and civilingeniør Haldor Topsøe.

        Liked by 1 person

      • ᛋᛉᚺ|ᛟᚾ · April 8

        Well that is disappointing indeed.. Especially considering that he is coined the father of Quantum physics however it appears his insight came from his peers who don’t get the monuments to founding.

        Liked by 1 person

      • vikinglifeblog · April 8

        Yeah. It is usually a group effort in physics and science in general.

        Liked by 1 person

      • vikinglifeblog · April 8

        “You are mostly correct, The Deparment of Energy Los Alamos in Nevada is the largest and most sophisticated of such complexes the Bannister complex pales in comparison.”

        They properly didn’t want to put all their eggs in one basket.

        “My father made it an annual event that everyone watch that film and even said to me your generation will witness an atomic explosion on U.S. soil a bit crazy considering that my retinas would be burned if that happened and I probably wouldn’t be alive to recall it.”

        It was a strange thing to grow up with. I dont think, that any normal person could imagine how quickly the Cold War ended.

        Liked by 1 person

      • ᛋᛉᚺ|ᛟᚾ · April 8

        Quite, I still recall school air-raid drills as of 1990 which did not continue in the years following. As if the Nuclear War Prepping America ceased operation and moved on to new kinds of fear mongering. Personally I rather have the former because at least the state informed the lay population about basic emergency preparation. I.e. Gasmasks were issued to families during the 1950s now however anyone with a Gasmask is either A) In the Military B) Police/Firefighter C)Medical/Industrial Trade D) Niche demographics usually fetishistic. In a post 9/11 World one does not go for a neighborhood stroll with a Gasmask on(Admittedly Not the brightest idea I ever had).

        Liked by 1 person

      • vikinglifeblog · April 8

        What kind of gas masks would you recommend?
        They used to test the “air-raid” alarm every wednesday at 12.00, when I was a child/teenager.

        Liked by 1 person

      • ᛋᛉᚺ|ᛟᚾ · April 9

        Any modern 40mm Compatible NATO Gasmask(American M40 or newer/British S10 or newer/German M65-M2000). The one in my photo is an antique WW2 German M30 with Danish Crown seal, I presume Post-WW2 Firebrigade which I don’t recommend unless you’re a collector of that sort of thing(I know I am). I’d like to get my hands on the current Bundeswehr M2000 which is almost impossible to acquire outside of Germany. Note that the as Draeger M65 lacks a drinking tube, so don’t plan on getting thirsty if you wear that one. Avoid the Soviet Masks as they’re not N.B.C compliant and filters are scarce or of questionable quality.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. ᛋᛉᚺ|ᛟᚾ · April 9

    Regarding gasmasks also stock up on spare 40mm filters I have a cache of sealed N.B.C. exp: 2020 filters for use against all chemical agents including Sarin Gas. Also keep away from older American and Asian 40mm filters as they include Chromium and you don’t want to breathe those especially considering that Chromium reacts rather badly with Radioactive Fallout as the South Koreans recently learned.

    Liked by 1 person

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