Scandinavians, Why Do They All Have the Same Name?

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Have you ever wondered why Scandinavian names are so similar and easy to recognize? It seems like they are all named Olsen/Olson, Andersen/Andersen, and a few other names. Well, this stereotype is not far from the truth. If one looks at the 10 most common surnames, these make up 26 percent of the population in Denmark, 19.5 percent in Sweden, and 9 percent in Norway. The Scandinavian countries are only rivaled by Spain (19.5 percent).The reason that it is so little variation in the family names of Scandinavians is the common practice of taking your father’s name and making it your own last name, by adding the ending sen (in Denmark and Norway) or son (Sweden). This means that if your father’s name was Peter, then your last name would become Petersen.

Even so, present day Scandinavians are not named after their father, but rather some distant great great grandfather. This is because the practice stopped in the 19th century, freezing the name. Thus, if a Scandinavian’s great great grandfather was named Karl, his son would become Karlsen, and his son would also become Karlsen (regardless of his father’s given name), and so on. The exception to this rule is Iceland, where the people are still named after their father.

Many Americans are of Scandinavian descent. There is a fair chance that this girl’s name is Jensen, Hansen, or Johansson.

Whereas Scandinavians are named after the given names of their forefathers, their British and German counterparts are often named after the occupation of their forefathers. This is seen in names like Smith/Schmidt, Taylor/Schneider, and Baker/Becker.

As we can see from this list, all the top 10 names of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden ends with either sen or son.

Denmark: Jensen, Nielsen, Hansen, Pedersen, Andersen, Christensen, Larsen, Sørensen, Rasmussen, Jørgensen

Norway: Hansen, Johansen, Olsen, Larsen, Andersen, Nilsen, Pedersen, Kristiansen, Jensen, Karlsen

Sweden: Johansson, Andersson, Karlsson, Nilsson, Eriksson, Larsson, Olsson, Persson, Svensson, Gustafsson

Source

21 comments

  1. ᛋᛉᚺ|ᛟᚾ · May 28, 2017

    “Whereas Scandinavians are named after the given names of their forefathers, their British and German counterparts are often named after the occupation of their forefathers. This is seen in names like Smith/Schmidt, Taylor/Schneider, and Baker/Becker.”

    Or “He who makes Jugs” Krueger/Krüger/Kröeger/Krugg most Missouri Kruegers are in the Ceramics business but most commonly those of the German Giessen Diaspora (1834) into America not so much more recent Emigration of the past 50 years.

    Liked by 1 person

    • vikinglifeblog · May 28, 2017

      Now we know what Freddy Krueger used to do, before he started harassing teenagers in their nightmares! 🙂
      They had a noble tradition of passing their skills to their children. Something that properly have played a big part of their culture and national development.

      Liked by 1 person

      • ᛋᛉᚺ|ᛟᚾ · May 28, 2017

        That is something sadly lost to me, I don’t even know which generation abandoned the tradition before my father and my knowledge of pottery is limited to glazes – minerals because of metallurgy.

        Liked by 1 person

    • vikinglifeblog · May 28, 2017

      It have properly something to do with industrialization and that people have been moving towards the cities for decades. And doing so changing jobs and lifestyles. This have happened within a few generations.

      Liked by 1 person

      • ᛋᛉᚺ|ᛟᚾ · May 28, 2017

        Yes, with few exceptions of course the German American Diaspora of 1834 brought millions of work-less tradesmen, in particular to Missouri the Ceramics trade has been well established by particular families for over 180+ years. The Newer flock however tend to come to the U.S. for work/school temporarily and decide otherwise to stay after some deliberation such as my father. In the lesser extent the much more recent are fleeing the enforced Holoahoax narrative of the German Republic or backwards Firearm laws.

        Liked by 1 person

    • vikinglifeblog · May 28, 2017

      Do German immigrants still seek towards the traditional German majority areas?

      Liked by 1 person

    • vikinglifeblog · May 29, 2017

      Yes, I remember. But with all the promotion of self hatred for white people, anti-German anti-white propaganda, I would be surprised that Germans would still seek German areas like in Missouri, Pennsylvania etc.

      Liked by 1 person

      • ᛋᛉᚺ|ᛟᚾ · May 29, 2017

        The central states have remained the most integrity in that regards, there aren’t many other places to go, both coasts are extreme Liberal not to mention the cost of living are just as extreme minus the outlying areas of course. As for Missouri, there are only two major cities in the entire state of which are less than half the size of the largest American cities, surrounded with 99.8% Racially Homogeneous outlying zones. A former peer of mine lives less than two miles south from where I live in another town which is 99% White demographically speaking with just one old Oriental lady in the whole population, he would have never even seen a Black person in his entire life if it were not for the fact that driving two miles North the cars suddenly shift from all White drivers to Sporadic Browns.

        Liked by 1 person

    • vikinglifeblog · May 29, 2017

      Lucky him! Good to know, that you people still have places of your own!

      Liked by 1 person

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  11. thefourthoccidentalempire · February 23, 2020

    Reblogged this on THE FOURTH REICH CENTURY.

    Like

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