Flakpanzer Gepard Self Propelled Anti-Aircraft Gun

The Flugabwehrkanonenpanzer Gepard (“anti-aircraft cannon tank Cheetah”, better known as the Flakpanzer Gepard) is an all-weather-capable German self-propelled anti-aircraft gun (SPAAG). It was developed in the 1960s and fielded in the 1970s, and has been upgraded several times with the latest electronics. It constituted a cornerstone of the air defence of the German Army (Bundeswehr) and a number of other NATO countries. In Germany, the Gepard was phased out in late 2010 to be replaced by “Leichtes Flugabwehrsystem (LeFlaSys)”, a mobile and stationary air defence system using the LFK NG missile and the new MANTIS gun system. The mobile platform of SysFla will likely be based on the GTK Boxer.

Gepard 1A2 of the German Army
Type Self-propelled anti-aircraft gun
Place of origin West Germany
Specifications
Mass 47.5 t (46.7 long tons; 52.4 short tons)
Length Overall: 7.68 m (25 ft 2 in)
Width 3.71 m (12 ft 2 in)
Height Radar retracted: 3.29 m (10 ft 10 in)
Crew 3 (driver, gunner, commander)

Armor conventional steel
Main
armament
2 × 35 mm Oerlikon GDF autocannon, each with 320 rounds anti-air ammunition and 20 rounds anti-tank
Secondary
armament
2 × quad 76mm smoke grenade dischargers
Engine 10-cylinder, 37,400 cc (2,280 cu inMTU multi-fuel engine
830 PS (819 hp, 610 kW)
Power/weight 17.5 PS/t
Suspension Torsion bar suspension
Operational
range
550 km (340 mi)
Speed 65 km/h (40 mph)

Closeup of the gun muzzle and the projectile velocity sensor

Source

Boxer (armoured fighting vehicle)

German Infantry Fighting Vehicle

German PzH 2000 – 155mm Self-Propelled Howitzer

Leopard 2

The Wiesel Tankette – Overview

German Divisions (Bundeswehr)

I. German/Dutch Corps

The German Panzer (WWII)

Tanks of the Future

Swedish Stridsvagn 103 (Strv 103) S-Tank

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