Sturmtiger Action!

One of the weirdest tanks used by the Germans in WWII, the Sturmtiger was a massive rocket propelled mortar mounted on a Tiger I hull. Devastating when used properly, only 19 examples of this odd creation were built, all seeing action, particularly on the Western Front during the last months of the war.

Mark Felton Productions

Sturmtiger 2.jpg
Sturmtiger (German: “Assault Tiger”) was a World War II German assault gun built on the Tiger I chassis and armed with a 380mm rocket-propelled round. The official German designation was Sturmmörserwagen 606/4 mit 38 cm RW 61. Its primary task was to provide heavy fire support for infantry units fighting in urban areas. The few vehicles produced fought in the Warsaw Uprising, the Battle of the Bulge and the Battle of the Reichswald. The fighting vehicle is also known under a large number of informal names, among which the Sturmtiger became the most popular.
Designer Alkett
Designed 1943–1944
Manufacturer Alkett
Produced October 1943 – January 1945
No. built 18 (using rebuilt Tiger I chassis)
Specifications
Weight 68 tonnes (75 short tons; 67 long tons)
Length 6.28 m (20 ft 7 in)
Width 3.57 m (11 ft 9 in)
Height 2.85 m (9 ft 4 in)
Crew 5
driver
machine gunner / radio operator
loader
2nd loader
commander / gunner

Armor max. 150 mm (superstructure front, at 47° from vertical)
min. 62 mm
Main
armament
380 mm RW 61 rocket launcher L/5.4
(14 rounds)
Secondary
armament
100 mm grenade launcher
(using SMi 35 leaping mines) 
7.92 mm (0.312 in) MG 34 machine gun
Engine V-12, water-cooled Maybach HL230P45 engine
700 PS (690 hp, 515 kW)
Power/weight 10.77 PS/tonne
Suspension torsion-bar
Operational
range
120 km (75 mi)
Speed 40 km/h (25 mph)

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One comment

  1. Pingback: Tiger I | VikingLifeBlog

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