Nordic Battlegroup

Sverigestan (Sweden) has never been neutral!

Coat of Arms of the Nordic Battlegroup.svg

The Nordic Battlegroup (NBG) is one of eighteen European Union battlegroups. It consists of around 2,500 soldiers including officers, with manpower contributed from the seven participating countries (Sweden, Finland, Norway, Ireland, Estonia, Latvia , and Lithuania). The military strategic command of the force is done in cooperation with any of the suitable five Operation Headquarters framework nations at the time for deployment. Denmark has opted out of the Common Security and Defence Policy of the EU, hence all battlegroups. Norway has negotiated an opt-in to participate, even though it is not an EU member state. Sweden, Finland and Norway have planned to form a joint battlegroup.

As of December 2014, the Nordic Battlegroup consisted of around 2,500 officers and soldiers: 

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An EU Battlegroup (EU BG) is a military unit adhering to the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) of the European Union (EU). Often based on contributions from a coalition of member states, each of the eighteen Battlegroups consists of a battalion-sized force (1,500 troops) reinforced with combat support elements. The groups rotate actively, so that two are ready for deployment at all times. The forces are under the direct control of the Council of the European Union.

The Battlegroups reached full operational capacity on 1 January 2007, although, as of January 2018 they are yet to see any military action. They are based on existing ad hoc missions that the European Union (EU) has undertaken and have been described by some as a new “standing army” for Europe. The troops and equipment are drawn from the EU member states under a “lead nation”. In 2004, United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan welcomed the plans and emphasised the value and importance of the Battlegroups in helping the UN deal with troublespots.

Billedresultat for the eastern europe burden eu is a sinking ship

The groups are intended to be deployed on the ground within 5–10 days of approval from the Council. It must be sustainable for at least 30 days, which could be extended to 120 days, if resupplied. 

The Battlegroups are designed to deal with those tasks faced by the Common Security and Defence Policy, namely the Petersberg tasks (military tasks of a humanitarian, peacekeeping and peacemaking nature). 

Planners claim the Battlegroups have enough range to deal with all those tasks, although such tasks ought to be limited in “size and intensity” due to the small nature of the groups. Such missions may include conflict prevention, evacuation, aid deliverance or initial stabilisation. In general these would fall into three categories; brief support of existing troops, rapid deployment preparing the ground for larger forces or small-scale rapid response missions. 

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Participating EU member states

Participating EU non-NATO member states

Participating non-EU NATO member states
Participating non-EU non-NATO member states
Non-participating EU member states

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Denmark

Make Scandinavia Danish Again!

Make Scandinavia Danish Again! – Kalmar Union 2.0

Sverigestan submit to your Danish overlords!

The Kalmar Union

Greenland belongs to Denmark and the Danish people!

Holsten Gate in Lübeck

Schleswig, Holstein, and Lauenburg

Dybbøl

Isted Lion

Constitution Day

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The Real Denmark

Denmark, the greatest country on earth!

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Flag of Sweden

Swedish nuclear weapons program

The history of Swedish iron and steel industry

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South Africa–Sweden relations

During apartheid Sweden lent significant support for the anti-apartheid movement within South Africa. During the 1960s a nationwide anti-apartheid movement was established in Sweden leading to Sweden becoming the only western country to give official support to the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa during the early 1970s.

Source

Circle of 12 gold stars on a blue background

Standby roster 

From 1 January 2005 the Battlegroups reached initial operational capacity: at least one Battlegroup was on standby every 6 months. The United Kingdom and France each had an operational Battlegroup for the first half of 2005, and Italy for the second half. In the first half of 2006, a Franco-German Battlegroup operated, and the Spanish–Italian Amphibious Battlegroup. In the second half of that year just one Battlegroup operated composed of France, Germany and Belgium. 

Full operational capacity was reached on 1 January 2007, meaning the Union could undertake two Battlegroup sized operations concurrently, or deploy them simultaneously into the same field. The Battlegroups rotate every 6 months, the roster from 2007 onwards is as follows; 

Period Battlegroup Framework Nation Other participants* Force HQ (FHQ) Size
2005 Jan–Jun Coats of arms of None.svg French Battlegroup France Paris
Coats of arms of None.svg British Battlegroup  United Kingdom London
Jul–Dec Coats of arms of None.svg Italian Battlegroup Italy Rome
vacant 
2006 Jan–Jun Coats of arms of None.svg French–German Battlegroup France Germany Paris
Coat of arms of the Hispano–Italian Amphibious Battle Group.svg Spanish–Italian Amphibious Battlegroup Italy Spain, Greece and Portugal Rome 1500
Jul–Dec Coats of arms of None.svg French–German–Belgian Battlegroup France Germany and Belgium Paris
vacant 
2007 Jan–Jun Coats of arms of None.svg French–Belgian Battlegroup France Belgium Paris
Battlegroup 107.jpg Battlegroup 107  Germany The Netherlands and Finland Potsdam 1720 
Jul–Dec Multinational Land Force.png Multinational Land Force  Italy Hungary and Slovenia Udine 1500
Coat of arms of the Balkan Battle Group.svg Balkan Battlegroup  Greece Bulgaria, Romania and Cyprus Larissa 1500
2008 Jan–Jun Coat of Arms of the Nordic Battlegroup.svg Nordic Battlegroup (NBG08) Sweden Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Finland, Ireland and Norway  Enköping 1500
Coats of arms of None.svg Spanish-led Battlegroup Spain Germany, France and Portugal ??? ???
Jul–Dec Coats of arms of None.svg French–German Battlegroup France Germany Paris ???
Coats of arms of None.svg British Battlegroup United Kingdom London
2009 Jan–Jun Coat of arms of the Hispano–Italian Amphibious Battle Group.svg Spanish–Italian Amphibious Battlegroup Italy Spain, Greece and Portugal Rome 1500
Coat of arms of the Balkan Battle Group.svg Balkan Battlegroup Greece Bulgaria, Romania and Cyprus tbd 1500
Jul–Dec Czech-Slovak Battlegroup.png Czech–Slovak Battlegroup Czech Republic Slovakia  2500
Coats of arms of None.svg Belgian-led Battlegroup Belgium Luxembourg and France  tbd ???
2010 Jan–Jun Grupa Bojowa I-2010.jpg Battlegroup I-2010  Poland Germany, Slovakia, Latvia and Lithuania Międzyrzecz
Coats of arms of None.svg UK–Dutch Battlegroup United Kingdom The Netherlands London 1500
Jul–Dec Coats of arms of None.svg Italian-Romanian-Turkish Battlegroup Italy Romania and Turkey Rome
Coats of arms of None.svg Spain, France, Portugal tbd tbd
2011 Jan–Jun Battlegroup 107.jpg Battlegroup 107 (EUBG 2011/1) Netherlands Germany, Finland, Austria and Lithuania tbd c. 2350 
Coat of Arms of the Nordic Battlegroup.svg Nordic Battlegroup (NBG11) Sweden Estonia, Finland, Ireland, Norway and Croatia  Enköping 1500
Jul–Dec Coat of arms of Eurofor.svg Eurofor (Eurofor EUBG 2011-2)  Portugal Spain, Italy, France Florence
Coat of arms of the Balkan Battle Group.svg Balkan Battlegroup  Greece Bulgaria, Romania, Cyprus and Ukraine  Larissa 1500
2012 Jan–Jun Coats of arms of None.svg French–Belgian–Luxembourgish Battlegroup France Belgium and Luxembourg Mont-Valérien
vacant 
Jul–Dec Multinational Land Force.png Multinational Land Force Italy Hungary and Slovenia. Udine
Coats of arms of None.svg German–Czech–Austrian Battlegroup Germany Austria, Czech Republic, Croatia, North Macedonia, Ireland  Ulm
2013 Jan–Jun Weimar Battlegroup.jpg Weimar Battlegroup (EU BG I/2013) Poland Germany and France Międzyrzecz
Coats of arms of None.svg Belgium, Luxembourg, France (unconfirmed)  tbd tbd tbd tbd
Jul–Dec Coats of arms of None.svg Battlegroup 42  United Kingdom Lithuania, Latvia, Sweden and the Netherlands London
Coats of arms of None.svg Belgium (unconfirmed)  Belgium
2014 Jan–Jun Coat of arms of the Balkan Battle Group.svg Balkan Battlegroup Greece Bulgaria, Romania, Cyprus and Ukraine 
Coats of arms of None.svg Sweden, Finland (unconfirmed)  Sweden
Jul–Dec Coats of arms of None.svg EUBG 2014 II  Belgium Germany, Luxembourg, Spain, the Netherlands and North Macedonia 2500–3700
Coat of arms of the Hispano–Italian Amphibious Battle Group.svg Spanish–Italian Amphibious Battlegroup Spain  Italy 
2015 Jan–Jun Coat of Arms of the Nordic Battlegroup.svg Nordic Battlegroup (NBG15) Sweden Norway, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Ireland  France 
vacant 
Jul–Dec Coats of arms of None.svg French–Belgian Battlegroup France  Belgium
vacant 
2016 Jan–Jun Visegrad group.png Visegrád Battlegroup  Poland Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Ukraine  Kraków 3700
Coat of arms of the Balkan Battle Group.svg Balkan Battlegroup Greece Bulgaria, Romania, Cyprus and Ukraine
Jul–Dec EUBG2016-2.png German–Czech–Austrian Battlegroup  Germany Austria, the Czech Republic, Croatia, Ireland, Luxembourg and the Netherlands 1500–2500
Coats of arms of None.svg British-led Battlegroup United Kingdom Finland, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Sweden and Ukraine
2017 Jan–Jun Multinational Land Force.png Multinational Land Force Italy Austria, Croatia, Hungary and Slovenia
Coats of arms of None.svg French–Belgian Battlegroup France Belgium
Jul–Dec Coat of arms of the Hispano–Italian Amphibious Battle Group.svg Spanish-led Battlegroup  Spain Italy, Portugal Bétera 2500
Multinational Land Force.png Multinational Land Force Italy Austria, Croatia, Hungary and Slovenia
2018 Jan–Jun Coat of arms of the Balkan Battle Group.svg Balkan Battlegroup Greece Bulgaria, Romania, Cyprus and Ukraine
Coats of arms of None.svg Benelux Battlegroup Netherlands Austria, Belgium, and Luxembourg
Jul–Dec Coats of arms of None.svg Benelux Battlegroup Netherlands Austria, Belgium, Germany and Luxembourg 2500–3700
vacant
2019 Jan–Jun Coats of arms of None.svg Spanish-led Battlegroup Spain Italy, Portugal
Coats of arms of None.svg French–Belgian Battlegroup France Belgium
Jul–Dec Visegrad group.png Visegrád Battlegroup  Poland Hungary, Czechia, Slovakia and Croatia
Coats of arms of None.svg French-led Batlegroup France
2020 Jan–Jun Coat of arms of the Balkan Battle Group.svg Balkan Battlegroup Greece Bulgaria, Romania, Cyprus, Ukraine and Serbia
vacant
Jul–Dec Coats of arms of None.svg German-Czech-Austrian Battlegroup Germany Austria, Czechia, Croatia, Finland, Ireland, Latvia, Netherlands and Sweden
Coats of arms of None.svg Italian-led Battlegroup Italy Greece, Spain

There are plans to extend the concept to air and naval forces, although not to the extent of having a single standing force on standby, but scattered forces which could be rapidly assembled.

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