Fourth-generation warfare

Fourth-generation warfare (4GW) is conflict characterized by a blurring of the lines between war and politics, combatants and civilians.

The term was first used in 1989 by a team of United States analysts, including paleoconservative William S. Lind, to describe warfare‘s return to a decentralized form. In terms of generational modern warfare, the fourth generation signifies the nation states‘ loss of their near-monopoly on combat forces, returning to modes of conflict common in pre-modern times.

The simplest definition includes any war in which one of the major participants is not a state but rather a violent non-state actor. Classical examples of this type of conflict, such as the slave uprising under Spartacus, predate the modern concept of warfare.

Elements 

Fourth-generation warfare is defined as conflicts which involve the following elements:

  • Complex and long term
  • Terrorism (tactic)
  • A non-national or transnational base – highly decentralized
  • A direct attack on the enemy’s culture, including genocidal acts against civilians.
  • Highly sophisticated psychological warfare and propaganda, especially through media manipulation, internet trolls, bots and lawfare
  • All available pressures are used – political, economic, social and military
  • Occurs in low intensity conflict, involving actors from all networks
  • Non-combatants are tactical dilemmas
  • Lack of hierarchy
  • Small in size, spread out network of communication and financial support
  • Use of insurgency tactics as subversion, terrorism and guerrilla tactics

Read more here

REPLACEMENT MIGRATION: IS IT A SOLUTION TO DECLINING AND AGEING POPULATION?

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP)

Genocide Convention

The Frankfurt School and Critical Theory – Cultural Marxism

(((ECHO)))

“The Great Replacement” Means the Extermination of the White Race through Mass Immigration.

Diversity Destroys Culture

Study: Increased Ethnic Diversity Making Whites Miserable

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s