Zimbabwe is on the Brink of Starvation : ( [The True Story of Zimbabwe]

Looks like Zimbabwe is on the brink of starvation again. How did this happen?

We explore the TRUE story of Zimbabwe.

MR. OBVIOUS

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Zimbabwe Tries to Lure Whites Back, Admits Black Farms a Disaster

Mugabe has said that people who murdered white farmers during a government-sanctioned purge in the 2000s will never be prosecuted.

Zimbabwean JAILED for sex attack on teen wins right to stay in UK …

Farm abandoned after white couple were evicted in favour of Zimbabwean who was a GP in Britain.

Racist anti-white dictator Robert Mugabe is dead!

 

Hans Ø the most western part of Denmark

From Wikipedia, so take it with a grain of salt.

HansIsland.png

Hans Island (DanishHans Ø) is a small, uninhabited barren knoll measuring 1.3 km2 (0.5 sq mi), 1,290 m (4,230 ft) long and 1,199 m (3,934 ft) wide, in the centre of the Kennedy Channel of Nares Strait—the strait that separates Ellesmere Island from northern Greenland and connects Baffin Bay with the Lincoln Sea. Hans Island is the smallest of three islands in Kennedy Channel off the Washington Land coast; the others are Franklin Island and Crozier Island. The strait at this point is 35 kilometres (22 mi) wide, placing the island within the territorial waters of both Canada and Greenland (Denmark).

A theoretical line in the middle of the strait goes through the island.

The island has likely been part of Inuit hunting grounds since the 14th century.

It is claimed by Denmark on behalf of Greenland’s home rule government and also by Canada. In accordance with the Greenland home rule treaty, Denmark handles certain foreign affairs, such as border disputes, on behalf of the entire Danish Realm. The nearest populated places are Alert, Canada (198 km or 123-mile distance, pop. 62), Siorapaluk, Greenland (349 km or 217-mile distance, pop. 68) and Qaanaaq, Greenland (379 km or 235-mile distance, pop. 656).

Location of Hans Island, between Greenland and Ellesmere Island

Early history 

Inuit living in northern Greenland or Canada would have known the island for centuries. In the mid 19th century, Nares Strait was likely unknown to Europeans. It is not known whether Vikings visited the island in the centuries when Greenland was inhabited by Norsemen.

From 1850 to 1880, the area in which Hans Island is situated was explored by American and British expeditions. These expeditions were a response partly due to the popular search for the missing British explorer John Franklin, and partly to search for the elusive Northwest Passage and/or reach the North Pole.

The Danish “Celebration Expedition” of 1920 to 1923 accurately mapped the whole region of the Northern Greenland coast from Cape York (Kap York) to Denmark Sound (Danmark fjord).

In 1933, the Permanent Court of International Justice declared the legal status of Greenland in favour of Denmark. Denmark claims geological evidence points to Hans Island being part of Greenland, and therefore it belongs to Denmark by extension of the Court’s ruling.

Since the 1960s, numerous surveys have been undertaken in the Nares Strait region, including seismic, ice flow, mapping, archeological and economic surveys. Canadian-based Dome Petroleum Ltd. made surveys on and around Hans Island from 1980 to 1983, to investigate the movement of ice masses. 

1972–73 border treaty 

In 1972, a team consisting of personnel from the Canadian Hydrographic Service and Danish personnel working in the Nares Strait determined the geographic coordinates for Hans Island. During negotiations between Canada and Denmark on their maritime boundary in 1973, both states claimed Hans Island was part of their territory. No agreement was reached between the two governments on the issue.

The maritime boundary immediately north and south of Hans Island was established in the continental shelf treaty ratified by Greenland and Canada and then submitted to the United Nations on December 17, 1973, in force since March 13, 1974. At the time, it was the longest shelf boundary treaty ever negotiated and may have been the first ever continental shelf boundary developed by a computer.

The Government of the Kingdom of Denmark and the Government of Canada, having decided to establish in the area between Greenland and the Canadian Arctic Islands a dividing line beyond which neither Party exercising its rights under the Convention on the Continental Shelf of April/29/1958 will extend its sovereign rights for the purpose of exploration and exploitation of the natural resources of the continental shelf…

The treaty lists 127 points (latitude and longitude) from the Davis Strait to the end of the Robeson Channel, where the Nares Strait runs into the Lincoln Sea, to draw geodesic lines between, to form the border. The treaty does not, however, draw a line from point 122 (80°49′12″N, 66°29′00″W) to point 123 (80°49′48″N, 66°26′18″W), a distance of 1,370 m (4,490 ft), because Hans Island is situated in between those two points. 

Joint administration 

In 1984 Kenn Harper, a historian from Iqaluit, wrote an article about Hans Island which was published in the local newspaper Nunatsiaq News in Qaanaaq (Thule) in northwestern Greenland. This article was picked up by a Danish newspaper in Copenhagen, and by CBC Radio in Canada. 

This article was sparked because of a chance encounter on the ice near Resolute, in the Canadian Arctic in the autumn of 1983. According to Harper, he met a man wearing a hat with bold letters around the side of the hat saying “HANS ISLAND, N.W.T.” This man was a scientist with Dome Petroleum who had just spent the summer on the island doing ice research. Dome Petroleum did research on and around the island from 1980 to 1983. 

Simultaneously, the Danish and Canadian governments were in the process of signing a cooperation agreement in relation to the marine environment in the Nares Strait. The agreement was signed and put into force on August 26, 1983. The Agreement addresses protection of the marine environment of the waters lying between Canada and Greenland, particularly with respect to preparedness measures as a contingency against pollution incidents resulting from offshore hydrocarbon exploration or exploitation and from shipping activities that may affect the marine environment.

One of the items also discussed was the possibility of establishing a reciprocal arrangement for processing applications to conduct research on and around Hans Island. This was never signed; however, Canadian John Munro, at the time Minister for Northern Affairs and Development, and Dane Tom Høyem, at the time Minister for Greenland, agreed, in common interest, to avoid acts that might prejudice future negotiations.

However, unknown to the politicians, Dome Petroleum was doing research on the island.

In 1984, the Danish Minister for Greenland planted the Danish flag on the Island and left a little message saying “Velkommen til den danske ø” (English: Welcome to the Danish Island) It is also said he left a bottle of brandy, however this seems to have been Schnapps, which unlike brandy is a traditional Danish spirit. The Canadians have reciprocated with their own sign, the flag of Canada and a bottle of Canadian Club.

Media attention and continuing negotiations 

Hans Island. NASA Landsat 7 image

Though CBC and others had done some reporting in the 1980s, the dispute came to popular attention through Canadian press stories during late March 2004. Within days, it spread to other newspapers worldwide.

On March 25, 2004, when Adrian Humphreys of the Canadian National Post newspaper wrote an article entitled “Five-year plan to ‘put footprints in the snow’ and assert northern sovereignty”, Humphreys made a brief mention of the dispute over Hans Island, and that the Danes had sent warships to the island.

The Arctic sea region has long been a subject of the dispute. In this matter, Canada, Denmark, IcelandRussia, and Norway share a common interest because they regard parts of the Arctic seas as “national waters”. The United States and most European Union countries, on the other hand, officially regard the region as international waters. Further items in the Canadian media led to the issue being picked up by international news organizations. 

The Government of Canada‘s 2004 budget was introduced on March 23, 2004, two days before the issue gained widespread attention. It proposed minimal increases to spending on national defence. The issue of Hans Island was raised in the Canadian Parliament by opposition foreign affairs critic Stockwell Day to highlight the government’s failure to provide more funding for the military.

A new article by Adrian Humphreys on March 30, 2004, also in the National Post, entitled “Danes summon envoy over Arctic fight—the solution of the dispute is not going to be military”, drew even more attention to the issue. The article claimed Brian Herman, Canada’s only diplomat in Denmark (ambassador Alfonso Gagliano having been recently recalled as a result of an unrelated Canadian scandal), was called before the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, to comment about his country’s intentions in the dispute, which had, according to the article, recently been inflamed by Danish sailors occupying Hans Island.

On March 31, 2004, the Danish and Canadian governments denied Herman or any other Canadian official was summoned to the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Both governments stated the dispute was a long-standing issue, and nothing had changed in the matter. 

A Canadian military exercise, named “Narwhal 04”, inflamed the issue further. However, this exercise had been in the planning stage since September 2003, and it took place around PangnirtungBaffin Island, 2,000 km (1,240 mi) south of Hans Island. The Canadian military denied the exercise had anything to do with the Danish–Canadian territorial dispute. The exercise took place from August 9 to 30, 2004, involving about 160 soldiers from the army, various aircraft, helicopters and one frigate, HMCS Montréal. About 600 Canadian Forces personnel were involved in total. 

A new development came to light after Canadian Defence Minister Bill Graham visited the island on July 20, 2005. Peter Taksø-Jensen, the head of the International Law department at Denmark’s foreign ministry, said the following in an interview with Reuters on July 25 in response to the event:

We consider Hans Island to be part of Danish territory and will therefore hand over a complaint about the Canadian minister’s unannounced visit.[15]

— Peter Taksø-Jensen, Danish Foreign Office

On August 18, 2005, Canadian frigate HMCS Fredericton left Halifax for an Arctic cruise. Canadian officials said the month-long patrol was unrelated to the Hans Island dispute. The Kingston-class coastal defence vessels HMCS Glace Bay and HMCS Shawinigan were also scheduled to patrol the Arctic in 2005. 

In July 2007, owing to updated satellite imagery, Canadian authorities realized the line constructed as a basis for the maritime boundary (but not for land) would have run roughly across the middle of the island, but the boundary did not “move” as that required a bilateral agreement by the two states for which negotiations continued. 

The two countries maintain a sense of humour in the dispute. Peter Taksøe-Jensen has stated “when Danish military go there, they leave a bottle of Schnapps. And when Canadian military forces come there, they leave a bottle of Canadian Club and a sign saying, ‘Welcome to Canada.'” 

Negotiations in 2012 between Canada and Denmark, not yet finalized, call for either a condominium or splitting the disputed island’s sovereignty in half. If the island were to be split by a boundary, it would create a second land neighbour for Canada and Denmark, each of which currently only has one, with the United States and Germany respectively.

On May 23, 2018, Canada and Denmark announced the creation of a Joint Task Force to determine the boundary between Canada and Greenland, including the fate of Hans Island. 

Google fight 

“Google fight” or “Google war” is the name given to a number of advertisements on the Internet search engine Google which promoted either Danish or Canadian sovereignty over Hans Island.

According to an article in the Ottawa Citizen on July 27, 2005, Toronto resident Rick Broadhead saw an advertisement on Google stating “Hans Island is Greenland. Greenland natives have used the island for centuries” and which linked to a Danish foreign affairs webpage that stated the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs had sent a note to Canada’s ambassador to Denmark on July 25, 2005 expressing Denmark’s regret “the Canadian Minister of National Defence had paid a visit to Hans Island without prior notification of the Danish Government”. Poul Erik Dam Kristensen, Denmark’s ambassador to Canada, told the press the paid advertisement was not a Danish government initiative and whoever placed it was acting alone. 

According to the article, this prompted Broadhead to put up his own advertisement on Google which linked to his own site, which promoted the Canadian claim to the island, on July 26.

Timeline 

  • 1980–1983 – Canadian firm Dome Petroleum did research on and around the island. 
  • 1984 – Tom Høyem, Danish Minister for Greenland, chartered a helicopter to the island. 
  • 1988 – The Danish Arctic Ocean patrol cutter HDMS Tulugaq (Y388) arrived at the island, built a cairn and placed a flagpole and Danish flag on the island. 
  • 1995 – The Danish liaison officer and geodesists Geodesy flew in and placed another flagpole and flag. 
  • Late August 1997 – The Danish Arctic/Ocean patrol cutter HDMS Agpa (Y387) tried to reach the island, but was forced to turn around 241 km (150 mi) from the Island, owing to extreme ice. 
  • 2001 – Keith Dewing and Chris Harrison, geologists with the Geological Survey of Canada who were mapping northern Ellesmere Island, flew by helicopter to the island. 
  • August 13, 2002 – The Danish inspection ship HDMS Vædderen (F359) arrived and erected a new cairn, flagpole and flag, finding the 1988 flag missing and the 1995 flag in pieces. 
  • August 1, 2003 – The crew of the Danish frigate HDMS Triton (F358) landed on the island and replaced the Danish flag again. 
  • July 13, 2005 – Canadian soldiers land on the Island, placing a traditional Inuit stone marker (Inukshuk) with a plaque and a Canadian flag. 
  • July 20, 2005 – As a symbolic move, Canadian Defence Minister Bill Graham set foot on the island. 
  • July 25, 2005 – A Danish government official announced Denmark would issue a letter of protest to Canada. 
  • July 25, 2005 – Deputy premier of Greenland, Josef Motzfeldt, stated the island had been occupied by Canada, stating experts should determine which country the island belongs to. 
  • July 28, 2005 – The Danish Ambassador to Canada published an article in the Ottawa Citizen newspaper regarding the Danish view on the Hans Island issue.
  • August 4, 2005 – The Danish Arctic/Ocean patrol cutter HDMS Tulugaq (Y388) was sent from Naval Station Grønnedal to Hans Island to assert Danish sovereignty. The cutter was expected to arrive in three weeks’ time. 
  • August 8, 2005 – Danish newspapers reported Canada wished to open negotiations regarding the future of Hans Island. The news was welcomed by Danish Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen who stated “It is time to stop the flag war. It has no place in a modern, international world. Countries like Denmark and Canada must be able to find a peaceful solution in a case such as this.”
  • August 16, 2005 – According to Danish Foreign Minister Per Stig Møller, Denmark and Canada agreed to reopen negotiations regarding the future of Hans Island. Denmark would immediately begin geological surveys in the area, and Per Stig Møller would meet his Canadian counterpart Pierre Pettigrew in New York City in the middle of September. Should they fail to reach an agreement, both governments have agreed to submit the dispute to the International Court of Justice in The Hague. The government of Greenland agreed to this course of action. Regarding the Danish patrol cutter HDMS Tulugaq (Y388) then en route to Hans Island, the minister stated “I have instructed the ship to sail there, but they will not go ashore tearing down [the Canadian] flag and replacing it with a new one. It would be a somewhat childish [behaviour] between two NATO allies.”
  • August 20, 2005 – Canada’s Foreign Affairs Minister, Pierre Pettigrew, stated Canada’s claim to the island had a firm basis in international law and would likely not end up before a world court. “Our sovereignty over the island has a very strong foundation,” the minister said in a telephone interview with a Canadian Press journalist.
  • September 19, 2005 – According to Canada’s Foreign Affairs Minister, Pierre Pettigrew, Canada and Denmark have agreed on a process to resolve the dispute over the island. Pettigrew and his Danish counterpart, Per Stig Møller, met in New York on this day. Pettigrew said the two countries would work together “to put this issue behind us.” However Pettigrew reiterated Canada has sovereignty over the island.
  • August 16, 2006 – A Vancouver geologist receives a prospecting permit for Hans Island from the Canadian government.
  • March 17, 2007 – Scientists from the University of Toronto and the Technical University of Denmark announced plans to install an automated weather station on the island, some time in the summer of 2007. 
  • July, 2007 – Canada updates satellite photos and recognizes its line constructed for the earlier maritime agreement would have run roughly through the middle of the island; negotiations continue with Denmark over establishing an international land boundary or island sovereignty. 
  • May 4, 2008 – An international group of scientists from Australia, Canada, Denmark, and the UK installed an automated weather station on Hans Island. 
  • April 11, 2012 – Proposal for Canada and Denmark to split Hans Island.
  • November 29, 2012 – Canada and Denmark settle an agreement on the exact border between them, though without defining the border near Hans Island.
  • May 23, 2018 – Canada and Denmark announce a Joint Task Force to settle the dispute over Hans Island.
  • February 2019 – Canadian geologist John Robins is granted a minerals exploration claim for Hans Island by the Canadian government as part of efforts to help the cause of Canada’s sovereignty claim.

Source

Greenland belongs to Denmark and the Danish people!

Russia tries to intimidate Denmark with new warship

Denmark

Image result for Dannebrog wiki

Hans Ø, Greenland, The North Pole and Scandinavia belongs to Denmark.

Foreign Volunteers for the Waffen-SS were Highly Intelligent and Ambitious

Swiss, Swedish and Danish men who volunteered for the Waffen-SS were highly intelligent and ambitious individuals, another study says.

Read more here from The Daily Archives

Denmark in WWII

Political drama in occupied Denmark

Free Corps Denmark

Free Corps Denmark – Witness To Soviet War Crimes

Operation Weserübung

German invasion of Denmark (1940)

World First Successfully Paratrooper Attack

The Six Hour War: 1940 German Invasion of Denmark: History Matters (Short Animated Documentary).

Denmark’s collaboration with Germany, during World War II

A Legacy of Dead German Children

Die Sahnefront

Panzer Unit Still Serving After German Defeat – Denmark 1945

The British invasion of Denmark and the ‘Stab in the Back’.

THE RIFLE SYNDICATE

Madsen: Danish Weapons Manufacturer

Højgaard & Schultz

B&W

B&W 1942

Aarhus was strategically important for Germany doing WWII

Kolding

Hanstholm

Denmark–Germany relations

Denmark–Germany

Danish-German sports cooperation, 1940-1945

WWII – Where did the Germans live?

Holmen

Holmen 1943

The Soviet Occupation of Bornholm

Rønne Harbour After the Russians Attacked 1945

Danish shipyards worked for the Danish Navy and the German Navy during the occupation 1940-45.

Christian Peder Kryssing was the highest ranked foreigner in Waffen-SS as a SS-Brigadeführer.

SørenKam

Documentary Sheds Light Upon Unrepentant Danish “Nazi Rock Star”

How Hitler decided to launch the largest bike theft in Denmark’s history

 

Norway

Operation Weserübung

Norway Divided by Plans of War Memorial Over Germanic SS Soldiers

Germanske SS Norge

21 Apr 1940- Norway

Norway apologises to its World War Two ‘German girls’

 

Sweden

The Swedish volunteers in the Waffen SS

The history of Swedish iron and steel industry

The Swedish King Tiger

Swedes Who fought in Waffen-SS During WWII still receive “Hitler Pensions”

 

Holland

Nederlandsche SS

23rd SS Volunteer Panzer Grenadier Division Nederland

34th SS Volunteer Grenadier Division Landstorm Nederland

34 Dutch Getting Pensions for Service with Waffen-SS (2019)

 

Denmark, Norway, Holland & Flanders

Battle of Narva 1944 – Tannenberg line defence and battle of the Blue hills

The Waffen-SS and the struggle for Pomerania, 1945 (Part I): The liberation of Arnswalde — “Neues Europa”.

Swiss, Swedish and Danish men who volunteered for the Waffen-SS were highly intelligent and ambitious individuals.

Germanic-SS

Germaansche SS in Vlaanderen

 

Belgium/Wallonien

Belgian Waffen-SS Volunteers Still Receive Pensions for Loyalty to Adolf Hitler (2019)

Leon Degrelle’s Escape to Spain 1945

 

UK

The British Free Corps

 

USA

American SS

List of sovereign states and dependencies by total fertility rate and by median age

Map of countries by fertility rate (2018), according to CIA World Factbook

This is a list of all sovereign states and dependencies by total fertility rate (TFR): the expected number of children born per woman in her child-bearing years.

Country ranking by most recent year 

Country ranking by Intergovernmental organizations 

2017 List by the World Bank
Rank Country Fertility rate
in 2017
(births/woman)
1  Niger 7.0
2  Somalia 6.2
3  Congo, Democratic Republic of the 6.0
4  Mali 6.0
5  Chad 5.8
6  Angola 5.6
7  Burundi 5.5
8  Nigeria 5.5
9  Gambia, The 5.3
10  Burkina Faso 5.3
11  Uganda 5.1
12  Tanzania 5.0
13  Mozambique 4.9
14  Benin 4.9
15  Central African Republic 4.8
16  Guinea 4.8
17  South Sudan 4.8
18  Zambia 4.7
19  Cote d’Ivoire 4.7
20  Senegal 4.7
21  Cameroon 4.6
22  Afghanistan 4.6
23  Mauritania 4.6
24  Equatorial Guinea 4.6
25  Guinea-Bissau 4.6
26  Congo, Republic of the 4.5
27  Sudan 4.5
28  Solomon Islands 4.4
29  Liberia 4.4
30  Togo 4.4
31  Sao Tome and Principe 4.4
32  Sierra Leone 4.4
33  Ethiopia 4.3
34  Malawi 4.3
35  Comoros 4.3
36  Madagascar 4.1
37  Eritrea 4.1
38  Timor-Leste 4.1
39  Rwanda 4.1
40  Gabon 4.0
41  Ghana 3.9
42  Samoa 3.9
43  Yemen 3.9
44  Vanuatu 3.8
45  Iraq 3.8
46  Palestinian territories (Gaza Strip and West Bank) 3.7
47  Zimbabwe 3.7
48  Seychelles 3.6
49  Kiribati 3.6
50  Papua New Guinea 3.6
51  Tajikistan 3.6
52  Tonga 3.6
53  Kenya 3.6
54  Pakistan 3.6
55  Namibia 3.4
56  Egypt 3.4
57  Lesotho 3.2
58  Israel 3.1
59  Micronesia, Federated States of 3.1
60  Algeria 3.0
61  Eswatini (Swaziland) 3.0
62  Kyrgyzstan /  Kyrgyz Republic 3.0
63  Haiti 3.0
64  Oman 2.9
65  Guatemala 2.9
66  Mongolia 2.9
67  Botswana 2.9
68  Jordan 2.8
69  Syria /  Syrian Arab Republic 2.8
70  Turkmenistan 2.8
71  Fiji 2.8
72  Djibouti 2.8
73  Bolivia 2.8
74  Kazakhstan 2.7
75  Laos /  Lao People’s Democratic Republic 2.7
76  Philippines 2.6
77  Cambodia 2.5
78  Faroe Islands (Denmark) 2.5
79  Honduras 2.5
80  Panama 2.5
81  Guyana 2.5
82  Uzbekistan 2.5
83  Paraguay 2.5
84  Morocco 2.5
85  Ecuador 2.5
86  Suriname 2.4
87  Nicaragua 2.4
88  South Africa 2.4
89  Saudi Arabia 2.4
90  Dominican Republic 2.4
  World 2.4
91  Belize 2.3
92  Indonesia 2.3
93  Guam (US) 2.3
94  Cabo Verde 2.3
95  Venezuela /  Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of 2.3
96  Libya 2.3
97  Argentina 2.3
98  Peru 2.3
99  India 2.2
100  Tunisia 2.2
101  Sri Lanka 2.2
102  Myanmar (Burma) 2.2
103  Mexico 2.2
104  Iran /  Iran, Islamic Republic of 2.1
105  Lebanon 2.1
106  Greenland (Denmark) 2.1
107  Kuwait 2.1
108  Grenada 2.1
109  Turkey 2.1
110  United States Virgin Islands (US) 2.1
111  Georgia 2.1
112  Bangladesh 2.1
113  El Salvador 2.1
  Population Replacement 2.1
114  Vietnam 2.0
115  Kosovo 2.0
116  Malaysia 2.0
117  Bahrain 2.0
118  Antigua and Barbuda 2.0
119  Bhutan 2.0
120  Jamaica 2.0
121  Uruguay 2.0
122  New Caledonia (France) 2.0
123    Nepal 2.0
124  French Polynesia (France) 2.0
125  France 1.9
126  St. Vincent and the Grenadines 1.9
127  Korea, North 1.9
128  Maldives 1.9
129  Azerbaijan 1.9
130  Qatar 1.9
131  Aruba (Netherlands) 1.8
132  Brunei /  Brunei Darussalam 1.9
133  Sweden 1.9
134  Colombia 1.8
135  Ireland 1.8
136  New Zealand 1.8
137  Saint Martin (France) (French part) 1.8
138  Denmark 1.8
139  United Kingdom 1.8
140  Costa Rica 1.8
141  United States 1.8
142  Australia 1.8
143  Russia /  Russian Federation 1.8
144  Bahamas, The 1.8
145  Armenia 1.8
146  Iceland 1.7
147  Latvia 1.7
148  Trinidad and Tobago 1.7
149  Brazil 1.7
150  Montenegro 1.7
151  Norway 1.7
152  Lithuania 1.7
153  China 1.6
154  Belgium 1.7
155  Chile 1.7
156  Netherlands 1.7
157  Romania 1.6
158  Albania 1.6
159  Cuba 1.6
160  Czech Republic /  Czechia 1.6
161  Barbados 1.6
162  Liechtenstein 1.6
163  Bermuda (UK) 1.6
164  Estonia 1.6
165  Slovenia 1.6
166  Germany 1.6
167  Belarus 1.5
168   Switzerland 1.5
169  Bulgaria 1.5
170  Thailand 1.5
171  Austria 1.5
172  Hungary 1.5
173 Channel Islands –  Guernsey (UK) and  Jersey (UK) 1.5
174  North Macedonia 1.5
175  Curaçao (Netherlands) 1.5
176  Canada 1.5
177  Finland 1.5
178  Slovak Republic /  Slovakia 1.5
179  Serbia 1.5
180  United Arab Emirates 1.4
181  St. Lucia 1.4
182  Mauritius 1.4
183  Japan 1.4
184  Croatia 1.4
185  Luxembourg 1.4
186  Poland 1.4
187  Greece 1.4
188  Ukraine 1.4
189  Malta 1.4
190  Portugal 1.4
191  Spain 1.3
192  Italy 1.3
193  Cyprus 1.3
194  Bosnia and Herzegovina 1.3
195  Moldova 1.3
196  Macau (China) 1.2
197  Singapore 1.2
198  Hong Kong (China) 1.1
199  Puerto Rico (US) 1.1
200  Korea, South 0.98
  World
World 2.4
  Major Regions
1 Sub-Saharan Africa (excluding high income) 4.8
2 Sub-Saharan Africa 4.8
3 Arab world 3.3
4 Middle East and North Africa (excluding high income) 2.9
5 Middle East and North Africa 2.8
6 South Asia 2.4
7 Latin America and Caribbean (excluding high income) 2.1
8 Latin America and Caribbean 2.0
9 Europe and Central Asia (excluding high income) 1.9
10 East Asia and Pacific (excluding high income) 1.9
11 East Asia and Pacific 1.8
12 Europe and Central Asia 1.8
13 North America 1.7
14 Central Europe and the Baltics 1.5
  States’ Size
1 Pacific Island small states 3.5
2 Other small states 3.1
3 Small states 2.9
4 Caribbean small states 2.0
  International Organizations
1 OECD members 1.7
2 European Union 1.6
  Security Situation
1 Fragile and conflict affected situations 4.3
  Economic Areas
1 Euro area 1.6
  Economic Situation
1 Heavily indebted poor countries (HIPC) 4.8
2 Least Developed Countries: UN classification 4.1
  Income
1 Low income countries 4.6
2 Lower middle income countries 2.7
3 Low and middle income countries 2.6
4 Middle income countries 2.3
5 Upper middle income countries 1.9
6 High income countries 1.6
  Not Ranked (no data or data from other years)
1  American Samoa (US)
2  Andorra 1.3 (2010)
3  British Virgin Islands (UK)
4  Cayman Islands (UK)
5  Dominica 1.9 (2003)
6  French Guiana (France)
7  Gibraltar (UK)
8  Guadeloupe (France)
9  Isle of Man (UK) 1.6 (2002)
10  Marshall Islands 4.0 (2011)
11  Mayotte (France)
12  Monaco
13  Nauru
14  Northern Mariana Islands (US)
15  Palau 2.2 (2015)
16  San Marino 1.3 (2012)
17  Sint Maarten (Netherlands) (Dutch part) 2.0 (2011)
18  St. Kitts and Nevis 2.1 (2002)
19  Turks and Caicos Islands
20  Tuvalu
21   Vatican City
22  Western Sahara

Note:

(-) Data unavailable, inapplicable, not collected or country or dependent territory not included. Sovereign states and dependent territories listed by alphabetical order, not ranked.

Country ranking by Governmental organizations 

2018 List by the CIA – CIA World Factbook
Rank Country Fertility rate
2018 estimate
(births/woman)
1  Niger 6.35
2  Angola 6.09
3  Burundi 5.93
4  Chad 5.90
5  Mali 5.90
6  Somalia 5.70
7  Uganda 5.62
8  Zambia 5.58
9  Malawi 5.43
10  South Sudan 5.34
11  Afghanistan 5.02
12  Mozambique 5.02
13  Liberia 5.00
14  Guinea 4.98
15  Ethiopia 4.91
16  Nigeria 4.85
17  Sudan 4.85
18  Guinea-Bissau 4.81
19  Burkina Faso 4.77
20  Tanzania 4.71
21  Sierra Leone 4.69
22  Benin 4.67
23  Timor-Leste 4.67
24  Cameroon 4.58
25  Congo, Democratic Republic of the 4.54
26  Togo 4.32
27  Equatorial Guinea 4.29
28  Congo, Republic of the 4.26
29  Central African Republic 4.25
30  Senegal 4.20
31  Sao Tome and Principe 4.11
32  Gaza Strip (Palestinian Territories) 3.97
33  Zimbabwe 3.97
34  Ghana 3.96
35  Madagascar 3.95
36  Iraq 3.94
37  Eritrea 3.90
38  Côte d’Ivoire 3.83
39  Mauritania 3.79
40  Western Sahara 3.79
41  Rwanda 3.75
42  Gabon 3.52
43  Yemen 3.48
44  Gambia, The 3.42
45  Egypt 3.41
46  Comoros 3.21
47  Namibia 3.21
48  West Bank (Palestinian Territories) 3.20
49  Jordan 3.14
50  Solomon Islands 3.09
51  Tonga 3.03
52  Philippines 2.99
53  Marshall Islands 2.98
54  Papua New Guinea 2.97
55  Vanuatu 2.97
56  Tuvalu 2.93
57  Guam (US) 2.92
58  Guatemala 2.87
59  Kenya 2.81
60  Belize 2.80
61  Oman 2.80
62  Nauru 2.76
63  Northern Mariana Islands (US) 2.76
64  Algeria 2.66
65  Haiti 2.66
66  Laos 2.65
67  Samoa 2.64
68  Eswatini (Swaziland) 2.63
69  Israel 2.63
70  Honduras 2.61
71  Kyrgyzstan 2.59
72  Lesotho 2.59
73  Tajikistan 2.59
74  Bolivia 2.58
75  American Samoa (US) 2.57
76  Pakistan 2.55
77  Botswana 2.53
78  Malaysia 2.48
79  Cambodia 2.47
80  Syria 2.44
  World 2.42
81  India 2.40
82  Fiji 2.37
83  Micronesia, Federated States of 2.37
84  Kuwait 2.37
85  Faroe Islands (Denmark) 2.34
86  Kiribati 2.34
87  Venezuela 2.30
88  Dominican Republic 2.28
89  Panama 2.28
90  Djibouti 2.27
91  South Africa 2.26
92  Argentina 2.25
93  Kazakhstan 2.22
94  Mexico 2.22
95  Cabo Verde 2.21
96  Tunisia 2.17
97  Cook Islands 2.16
98  Bangladesh 2.15
99  Ecuador 2.15
100  Burma (Myanmar) 2.13
101  Peru 2.10
  Population Replacement 2.10
102  Jamaica 2.09
103  Morocco 2.09
104  Indonesia 2.08
105    Nepal 2.07
106  France 2.06
107  Turkmenistan 2.06
108  United States Virgin Islands (US ) 2.06
109  Sri Lanka 2.05
110  Mongolia 2.04
111  Saudi Arabia 2.04
112  Sint Maarten (Netherlands) (Dutch part) 2.04
113  Curacao (Netherlands) 2.03
114  Dominica 2.03
115  Libya 2.03
116  New Zealand 2.01
117  Grenada 2.00
118  Turkey 2.00
119  Antigua and Barbuda 1.99
120  Iceland 1.99
121  Colombia 1.98
122  Greenland (Denmark) 1.97
123  Guyana 1.97
124  Iran 1.96
125  Ireland 1.96
126  Bahamas, The 1.94
127  Korea, North 1.94
128  Bermuda (UK) 1.92
129  Isle of Man (UK) 1.92
130  New Caledonia (France) 1.92
131  Gibraltar (UK) 1.90
132  Paraguay 1.90
133  Suriname 1.90
134  Azerbaijan 1.89
135  Costa Rica 1.89
136  Qatar 1.89
137  United Kingdom 1.88
138  Bhutan 1.87
139  French Polynesia (France) 1.87
140  Nicaragua 1.87
141  Sweden 1.87
142  Norway 1.85
143  Seychelles 1.85
144  Cayman Islands (UK) 1.84
145  El Salvador 1.84
146  Aruba (Netherlands) 1.83
147  Chile 1.79
148  Uruguay 1.79
149  Vietnam 1.79
150  Belgium 1.78
151  Denmark 1.78
152  Netherlands 1.78
153  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 1.78
154  Australia 1.77
155  Brunei 1.77
156  Saint Kitts and Nevis 1.77
157  Georgia 1.76
158  Finland 1.75
159  Uzbekistan 1.75
160  Anguilla (UK) 1.74
161  Mauritius 1.74
162  Saint Lucia 1.74
163  Bahrain 1.73
164  United Arab Emirates 1.73
165  Lebanon 1.72
166  Maldives 1.72
167  Wallis and Futuna (France) 1.72
168  Cuba 1.71
169  Palau 1.70
170  Trinidad and Tobago 1.70
171  Turks and Caicos Islands (UK) 1.70
172  Liechtenstein 1.69
173  Barbados 1.68
174  Jersey (UK) 1.66
175  Brazil 1.65
176  Armenia 1.64
177  Luxembourg 1.62
 European Union 1.62
178  Russia 1.61
179  Canada 1.60
180  China, People’s Republic of 1.6
181  Estonia 1.60
182  Lithuania 1.60
183  Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha (UK) 1.59
184  Slovenia 1.58
185  Guernsey (UK) 1.57
186  Moldova 1.57
187  Saint Pierre and Miquelon (France) 1.57
188   Switzerland 1.56
189  Ukraine 1.55
190  Monaco 1.54
191  Albania 1.52
192  Latvia 1.52
193  Thailand 1.52
194  San Marino 1.51
195  Spain 1.50
196  Belarus 1.49
197  North Macedonia 1.49
198  Austria 1.48
199  Malta 1.48
200  Bulgaria 1.47
201  Cyprus 1.47
202  Czechia /  Czech Republic 1.46
203  Germany 1.46
204  Hungary 1.45
205  Italy 1.45
206  Greece 1.44
207  Serbia 1.44
208  Japan 1.42
209  Slovakia /  Slovak Republic 1.42
210  Andorra 1.41
211  Croatia 1.41
212  Portugal 1.39
213  Poland 1.36
214  Romania 1.36
215  Montserrat (UK) 1.34
216  Bosnia and Herzegovina 1.31
217  British Virgin Islands (UK) 1.30
218  Korea, South 1.27
219  Puerto Rico (US) 1.21
220  Hong Kong (China) 1.20
221  Taiwan 1.13
222  Macau (China) 0.95
223  Singapore 0.84
  Not Ranked (no data or data from other years)
1  Christmas Island (Australia)
2  Cocos (Keeling) Islands (Australia)
3  Falkland Islands / Islas Malvinas (UK)
4  French Guiana (France)
5  Kosovo
6  Montenegro
7  Niue
8  Norfolk Island (Australia)
9  Pitcairn Islands (UK)
10  Saint Martin (France) (French part)
11  Svalbard (Norway)
12  Tokelau (New Zealand)
13  United States 1.87 (2017)
14   Vatican City
2019 List by the INED – Institut National d’Études Démographiques
Rank Country Fertility rate
in 2019
(births/woman
1  Niger 6.8
2  Somalia 6.0
3  Congo, Democratic Republic of the 5.8
4  Mali 5.8
5  Chad 5.6
6  Angola 5.4
7  Burundi 5.3
8  Nigeria 5.3
9  Gambia, The 5.2
10  Burkina Faso 5.1
11  Benin 4.8
12  Mozambique 4.8
13  Tanzania 4.8
14  Uganda 4.8
15  Central African Republic 4.6
16  Côte d’Ivoire 4.6
17  Guinea 4.6
18  Senegal 4.6
19  South Sudan 4.6
20  Zambia 4.6
21  Cameroon 4.5
22  Mauritania 4.5
23  Congo, Republic of the 4.4
24  Equatorial Guinea 4.4
25  Guinea-Bissau 4.4
26  Afghanistan 4.3
27  Sao Tome and Principe 4.3
28  Sudan 4.3
29  Togo 4.3
30  Liberia 4.2
31  Sierra Leone 4.2
32  Comoros 4.1
33  Ethiopia 4.1
34  Malawi 4.1
35  Marshall Islands 4.1
36  Eritrea 4.0
37  Madagascar 4.0
38  Rwanda 4.0
39  Gabon 3.9
40  Solomon Islands 3.9
41  Timor-Leste 3.9
42  Ghana 3.8
43  Samoa 3.8
44  Vanuatu 3.7
45  Yemen 3.7
46  Iraq 3.6
47  Mayotte (France) 3.6
48  Palestinian Territory (Gaza Strip and West Bank) 3.6
49  Tajikistan 3.6
50  Kiribati 3.5
51  Pakistan 3.5
52  Papua New Guinea 3.5
53  Tonga 3.5
54  Zimbabwe 3.5
55  Kenya 3.4
56  Egypt 3.3
57  French Guiana (France) 3.3
58  Namibia 3.3
59  Lesotho 3.1
60  Algeria 3.0
61  Israel 3.0
62  Kyrgyzstan 3.0
63  Micronesia, Federated States of 3.0
64  Eswatini (Swaziland) 3.0
65  Haiti 2.9
66  Mongolia 2.9
67  Botswana 2.8
68  Fiji 2.8
69  Guatemala 2.8
70  Oman 2.8
71  Syria 2.8
72  Bolivia 2.7
73  Djibouti 2.7
74  Jordan 2.7
75  Kazakhstan 2.7
76  Turkmenistan 2.7
77  Laos 2.6
78  Cambodia 2.5
79  Philippines 2.5
80  Ecuador 2.4
81  Guyana 2.4
82  Honduras 2.4
83  Morocco 2.4
84  Nicaragua 2.4
85  Panama 2.4
86  Paraguay 2.4
87  Seychelles 2.4
88  South Africa 2.4
89  Suriname 2.4
90  Uzbekistan 2.4
91  Western Sahara 2.4
  World 2.4
92  Belize 2.3
93  Dominican Republic 2.3
94  Guam (US) 2.3
95  Indonesia 2.3
96  Saudi Arabia 2.3
97  Venezuela 2.3
98  Argentina 2.2
99  Cabo Verde 2.2
100  India 2.2
101  Libya 2.2
102  Peru 2.2
103  Reunion (France) 2.2
104  Sri Lanka 2.2
105  Tunisia 2.2
106  Azerbaijan 2.1
107  Georgia 2.1
108  Guadeloupe (France) 2.1
109  Iran 2.1
110  Kuwait 2.1
111  Lebanon 2.1
112  Mexico 2.1
113  Myanmar (Burma) 2.1
114  Turkey 2.1
115  Viet Nam 2.1
  Population Replacement 2.1
116  Antigua and Barbuda 2.0
117  Bahrain 2.0
118  Bangladesh 2.0
119  Bhutan 2.0
120  El Salvador 2.0
121  Grenada 2.0
122  Jamaica 2.0
123  Malaysia 2.0
124  Uruguay 2.0
125  United States Virgin Islands (US) 2.0
126  Aruba (Netherlands) 1.9
127  French Polynesia (France) 1.9
128  Korea, North 1.9
129  Martinique (France) 1.9
130  Monaco 1.9
131    Nepal 1.9
132  New Caledonia (France) 1.9
133  New Zealand 1.9
134  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 1.9
135  Armenia 1.8
136  Australia 1.8
137  Brunei 1.8
138  Colombia 1.8
139  Denmark 1.8
140  Dominica 1.8
141  France (Metropolitan France) 1.8
142  Ireland 1.8
143  Maldives 1.8
144  Qatar 1.8
145  Russia 1.8
146  Saint Kitts and Nevis 1.8
147  Sweden 1.8
148  United States 1.8
149  Bahamas 1.7
150  Belarus 1.7
151  Belgium 1.7
152  Brazil 1.7
153  China (mainland only) 1.6
154  Costa Rica 1.7
155  Curaçao (Netherlands) 1.7
156  Czechia /  Czech Republic 1.7
157  Iceland 1.7
158  Kosovo 1.7
159  Latvia 1.7
160  Lithuania 1.7
161  Montenegro 1.7
162  Norway 1.7
163  Trinidad and Tobago 1.7
164  United Kingdom 1.7
165  Albania 1.6
166  Barbados 1.6
167  Bulgaria 1.6
168  Chile 1.6
169  Cuba 1.6
170  Estonia 1.6
171  Germany 1.6
172  Romania 1.6
173  Slovenia 1.6
174  Austria 1.5
175  Canada 1.5
176  Cyprus 1.3
177  Finland 1.5
178  Hungary 1.5
179  Malta 1.5
180  North Macedonia 1.5
181  Slovakia /  Slovak Republic 1.5
182   Switzerland 1.5
183  Thailand 1.5
184  Croatia 1.4
185  Hong Kong (China) 1.4
186  Japan 1.4
187  Liechtenstein 1.4
188  Luxembourg 1.4
189  Mauritius 1.4
190  Netherlands 1.4
191  Poland 1.4
192  Saint Lucia 1.4
193  Serbia 1.4
194  Ukraine 1.4
195  United Arab Emirates 1.4
196  Bosnia and Herzegovina 1.3
197  Greece 1.3
198  Italy 1.3
199  Moldova 1.3
200  Portugal 1.3
201  San Marino 1.3
202  Spain 1.3
203  China, Republic of (Taiwan) 1.2
204  Macau (China) 1.2
205  Puerto Rico (US) 1.2
206  Singapore 1.2
207  Korea, South 1.1
208  Andorra 1.0
  World
1 World 2.4
  Continents
1 Africa 4.4
2 Oceania 2.3
3 Asia 2.1
4 Americas 1.9
5 Europe 1.6
  Major Regions
1 Middle Africa 5.4
2 Western Africa 5.1
3 Eastern Africa 4.3
4 Northern Africa 3.2
5 Central Asia 2.7
6 Western Asia 2.6
7 Southern Africa 2.5
8 Oceania 2.3
9 South Asia 2.3
10 Caribbean 2.2
11 Central America 2.2
12 Southeast Asia 2.2
13 South America 1.9
14 East Asia 1.7
15 Eastern Europe 1.7
16 Northern America 1.7
17 Northern Europe 1.7
18 Western Europe 1.7
19 Southern Europe 1.3
  Not Ranked
1 Channel Islands –  Guernsey (UK) and  Jersey (UK)
2  Christmas Island (Australia)
3  Cocos (Keeling) Islands (Australia)
4  European Union
5  Falkland Islands (UK)
6  Faroe Islands (Denmark)
7  Nauru
8  Niue
9  Norfolk Island (Australia)
10  Palau
11  Pitcairn Islands (UK)
12  Svalbard (Norway)
13  Tokelau (New Zealand)
14  Tuvalu
15   Vatican City

Note:

(-) Data unavailable, inapplicable, not collected or country or dependent territory not included. Sovereign states and dependent territories listed by alphabetical order, not ranked.

Country ranking by Nongovernmental organizations 

2019 List by the PRB – Population Reference Bureau
Rank Country Fertility rate
in 2019
(births/woman)
1  Niger 7.0
2  Mali 6.3
3  Angola 6.2
4  Somalia 6.2
5  Chad 6.0
6  Congo, Democratic Republic of the 6.0
7  Benin 5.7
8  Burundi 5.5
9  Burkina Faso 5.3
10  Gambia, The 5.3
11  Nigeria 5.3
12  Uganda 5.1
13  Tanzania 5.0
14  Guinea-Bissau 4.9
15  Mozambique 4.9
16  Cameroon 4.8
17  Central African Republic 4.8
18  Guinea 4.8
19  Mayotte (France) 4.8
20  South Sudan 4.8
21  Zambia 4.7
22  Afghanistan 4.6
23  Côte d’Ivoire 4.6
24  Equatorial Guinea 4.6
25  Madagascar 4.6
26  Mauritania 4.6
27  Senegal 4.6
28  Congo, Republic of the 4.5
29  Sudan 4.5
30  Ethiopia 4.4
31  Togo 4.4
32  Comoros 4.3
33  Papua New Guinea 4.3
34  Samoa 4.3
35  Liberia 4.2
36  Malawi 4.2
37  Timor-Leste 4.2
38  Eritrea 4.1
39  Rwanda 4.1
40  Sierra Leone 4.1
41  Solomon Islands 4.1
42  Ghana 3.9
43  Yemen 3.9
44  Marshall Islands 3.8
45  Nauru 3.7
46  Palestinian Territory (Gaza Strip and West Bank) 3.7
47  Vanuatu 3.7
48  Zimbabwe 3.7
49  French Guiana (France) 3.6
50  Gabon 3.6
51  Iraq 3.6
52  Kenya 3.6
53  Kiribati 3.6
54  Pakistan 3.6
55  Tuvalu 3.6
56  Tajikistan 3.5
57  Tonga 3.5
58  Namibia 3.4
59  Sao Tome and Principe 3.4
60  Egypt 3.3
61  Kyrgyzstan 3.3
62  Lesotho 3.2
63  Micronesia, Federated States of 3.2
64  Algeria 3.1
65  Israel 3.1
66  Guam (US) 3.0
67  Haiti 3.0
68  Kazakhstan 3.0
69  Mongolia 2.9
70  Oman 2.9
71  Syria 2.9
72  Bolivia 2.8
73  Djibouti 2.8
74  Turkmenistan 2.8
75  Guatemala 2.7
76  Jordan 2.7
77  Laos 2.7
78  Philippines 2.7
79  Eswatini (Swaziland) 2.7
80  Botswana 2.6
81  Cambodia 2.5
82  Ecuador 2.5
83  Guyana 2.5
84  Honduras 2.5
85  Paraguay 2.5
86  Reunion (France) 2.5
87  Seychelles 2.5
88  Fiji 2.4
89  Nicaragua 2.4
90  Panama 2.4
91  Suriname 2.4
92  Uzbekistan 2.4
93  Western Sahara 2.4
  World 2.4
94  Argentina 2.3
95  Belize 2.3
96  Cabo Verde 2.3
97  Dominican Republic 2.3
98  El Salvador 2.3
99  Indonesia 2.3
100  New Caledonia (France) 2.3
101  Peru 2.3
102  South Africa 2.3
103  Venezuela 2.3
104  India 2.2
105  Kuwait 2.2
106  Libya 2.2
107  Morocco 2.2
108  Myanmar (Burma) 2.2
109  Bangladesh 2.1
110  Georgia 2.1
111  Grenada 2.1
112  Iran 2.1
113  Jamaica 2.1
114  Lebanon 2.1
115  Maldives 2.1
116  Mexico 2.1
117  Saudi Arabia 2.1
118  Sri Lanka 2.1
119  Tunisia 2.1
  Population Replacement 2.1
120  Bahrain 2.0
121  Colombia 2.0
122  French Polynesia (France) 2.0
123  Guadeloupe (France) 2.0
124    Nepal 2.0
125  Palau 2.0
126  Turkey 2.0
127  Uruguay 2.0
128  Viet Nam 2.0
129  Antigua and Barbuda 1.9
130  Brunei 1.9
131  Korea, North 1.9
132  Malaysia 1.9
133  Martinique (France) 1.9
134  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 1.9
135  Albania 1.8
136  Azerbaijan 1.8
137  Bahamas 1.8
138  Dominica 1.8
139  France 1.8
140  Ireland 1.8
141  Montenegro 1.8
142  Qatar 1.8
143  Saint Kitts and Nevis 1.8
144  Sweden 1.8
145  Australia 1.7
146  Bhutan 1.7
147  Brazil 1.7
148  Chile 1.7
149  Costa Rica 1.7
150  Cuba 1.7
151  Curaçao (Netherlands) 1.7
152  Czechia /  Czech Republic 1.7
153  Denmark 1.7
154  Estonia 1.7
155  Iceland 1.7
156  New Zealand 1.7
157  United Kingdom 1.7
158  United States 1.7
159  Armenia 1.6
160  Barbados 1.6
161  Belarus 1.6
162  Belgium 1.6
163  Bulgaria 1.6
164  China (mainland only) 1.6
165  Germany 1.6
166  Kosovo 1.6
167  Latvia 1.6
168  Lithuania 1.6
169  Netherlands 1.6
170  Norway 1.6
171  Russia 1.6
172  Slovenia 1.6
173  Trinidad and Tobago 1.6
174  Austria 1.5
175  Canada 1.5
176  Cyprus 1.5
177  Hungary 1.5
178  Poland 1.5
179  Saint Lucia 1.5
180  Serbia 1.5
181  Slovakia /  Slovak Republic 1.5
182   Switzerland 1.5
183  Thailand 1.5
 European Union 1.5
184  Croatia 1.4
185  Finland 1.4
186  Greece 1.4
187  Japan 1.4
188  Liechtenstein 1.4
189  Luxembourg 1.4
190  Mauritius 1.4
191  North Macedonia 1.4
192  Portugal 1.4
193  Ukraine 1.4
194  United Arab Emirates 1.4
195  Bosnia and Herzegovina 1.3
196 Channel Islands –  Guernsey (UK) and  Jersey (UK) 1.3
197  Italy 1.3
198  Malta 1.3
199  Romania 1.3
200  San Marino 1.3
201  Spain 1.3
202  Moldova 1.2
203  China, Republic of (Taiwan) 1.1
204  Hong Kong (China) 1.1
205  Puerto Rico (US) 1.1
206  Singapore 1.1
207  Andorra 1.0
208  Korea, South 1.0
209  Macau (China) 0.9
  World
1 World 2.4
  Continents
1 Africa 4.5
2 Oceania 2.4
3 Asia (excluding China) 2.3
3 Asia 2.1
4 Americas 1.9
5 Europe 1.5
  Major Regions
1 Middle Africa 5.7
2 Western Africa 5.2
3 Sub-Saharan Africa 4.8
4 Eastern Africa 4.5
5 Northern Africa 3.2
6 Central Asia 2.8
7 Western Asia 2.6
8 Oceania 2.4
9 Southern Africa 2.4
10 South Asia 2.3
11 Caribbean 2.2
12 Central America 2.2
13 Southeast Asia 2.2
14 Latin America and the Caribbean 2.0
15 South America 2.0
16 Northern America 1.7
17 Northern Europe 1.7
18 Western Europe 1.7
19 East Asia 1.5
20 Eastern Europe 1.5
21 Southern Europe 1.3
  Development Level
1 Least Developed 4.1
2 Less Developed (excluding China) 2.8
3 Less Developed 2.5
4 More Developed 1.6
  Income
1 Low Income 4.6
2 Middle Income 2.3
2.1 – Lower Middle Income 2.7
2.2 – Upper Middle Income 1.8
3 High Income 1.6
  Not Ranked
1  Christmas Island (Australia)
2  Cocos (Keeling) Islands (Australia)
3  Falkland Islands (UK)
4  Faroe Islands (Denmark)
5  Monaco
6  Niue
7  Norfolk Island (Australia)
8  Pitcairn Islands (UK)
9  Svalbard (Norway)
10  Tokelau (New Zealand)
11   Vatican City
2019 List by the OWID – Our World In Data
Rank Country Fertility rate
in 2019
(births/woman)
1  Niger 7.07
2  Somalia 5.98
3  Congo, Democratic Republic of the 5.82
4  Mali 5.79
5  Chad 5.65
6  Angola 5.48
7  Burundi 5.45
8  Nigeria 5.32
9  Uganda 5.32
10  Gambia, The 5.22
11  Burkina Faso 5.11
12  Mozambique 5.05
13  Tanzania 4.83
14  Zambia 4.81
15  Benin 4.77
16  Cote d’Ivoire 4.72
17  Central African Republic 4.65
18  Guinea 4.62
19  South Sudan 4.62
20  Senegal 4.55
21  Equatorial Guinea 4.43
22  Afghanistan 4.18
23  Cameroon 4.51
24  Mauritania 4.49
25  Congo, Republic of the 4.48
26  Guinea-Bissau 4.41
27  Liberia 4.38
28  Malawi 4.38
29  Sudan 4.35
30  Sao Tome and Principe 4.27
31  Sierra Leone 4.17
32  Togo 4.26
33  Iraq 4.19
34  Comoros 4.14
35  Madagascar 4.02
36  Eritrea 3.92
37  Ethiopia 3.86
38  Samoa 3.83
39  Ghana 3.81
40  Solomon Islands 3.69
41  Yemen 3.69
42  Kenya 3.68
43  Rwanda 3.67
44  Gabon 3.59
45  Kiribati 3.53
46  Zimbabwe 3.53
47  Papua New Guinea 3.52
48  Tonga 3.52
49  Pakistan 3.29
50  Namibia 3.24
51  Tajikistan 3.22
52  French Guiana (France) 3.21
53  Jordan 3.18
54  Vanuatu 3.17
55  Egypt 3.10
56  Lesotho 2.95
57  Eswatini (Swaziland) 2.94
58  Israel 2.89
59  Kyrgyzstan 2.86
60  Philippines 2.84
61  Guatemala 2.82
62  Bolivia 2.77
63  Haiti 2.77
64  Syria 2.77
65  Turkmenistan 2.74
66  Djibouti 2.67
67  Mongolia 2.63
68  Botswana 2.60
69  Algeria 2.59
70  Kazakhstan 2.54
71  Laos 2.54
72  Oman 2.46
73  Cambodia 2.47
74  Saudi Arabia 2.42
75  Belize 2.41
76  Fiji 2.45
77  Guyana 2.44
78  Panama 2.43
79  Ecuador 2.41
80  Paraguay 2.40
  World 2.40
81  Morocco 2.38
82  South Africa 2.38
83  Honduras 2.35
84  Dominican Republic 2.34
85  Peru 2.31
86  Suriname 2.30
87  Indonesia 2.29
88  Cabo Verde 2.24
89  India 2.26
90  Argentina 2.25
91  Venezuela 2.25
92  Seychelles 2.23
93  Uzbekistan 2.21
94  Libya 2.16
95  Myanmar (Burma) 2.15
96  Nicaragua 2.12
97  Tunisia 2.12
98  New Caledonia (France) 2.11
  Population Replacement 2.10
99  Mexico 2.09
100  Grenada 2.04
101  Antigua and Barbuda 2.02
102  Azerbaijan 2.02
103  Bangladesh 2.02
104  El Salvador 2.02
105    Nepal 2.02
106  Sri Lanka 2.01
107  Turkey 2.00
108  Ireland 1.98
109  Malaysia 1.98
110  Maldives 1.98
111  France 1.97
112  Georgia 1.97
113  Jamaica 1.97
114  Bahrain 1.96
115  Bhutan 1.96
116  New Zealand 1.96
117  Uruguay 1.96
118  Kuwait 1.94
119  Vietnam 1.94
120  Iceland 1.91
121  Sweden 1.91
122  United States 1.90
123  Korea, North 1.88
124  St. Vincent and the Grenadines 1.87
125  United Kingdom 1.87
126  Qatar 1.85
127  Brunei 1.84
128  Norway 1.83
129  Australia 1.82
130  Barbados 1.80
131  Belgium 1.80
132  Colombia 1.80
133  Finland 1.78
134  Denmark 1.77
135  Russia 1.77
136  Chile 1.75
137  Netherlands 1.75
138  Bahamas, The 1.74
139  Costa Rica 1.74
140  Belarus 1.72
141  Cuba 1.72
142  Trinidad and Tobago 1.72
143  Albania 1.70
144  Lebanon 1.70
145  United Arab Emirates 1.70
146  Brazil 1.69
147  Lithuania 1.68
148  Estonia 1.67
149  Montenegro 1.65
150  Slovenia 1.65
151  China 1.6
152  Serbia 1.63
153  Luxembourg 1.61
154  Bulgaria 1.60
155  Armenia 1.59
156  Czech Republic /  Czechia 1.59
157  Iran 1.59
158  Latvia 1.59
159  Ukraine 1.58
160  Canada 1.56
161  Macedonia 1.56
162   Switzerland 1.56
163  Romania 1.55
164  Austria 1.53
165  Italy 1.51
166  Japan 1.50
167  Malta 1.49
168  Germany 1.48
169  Puerto Rico (US) 1.46
170  Croatia 1.44
171  Thailand 1.44
172  St. Lucia 1.43
173  Mauritius 1.42
174  Bosnia and Herzegovina 1.41
175  Hungary 1.41
176  Spain 1.41
177  Korea, South 1.35
178  Cyprus 1.33
179  Greece 1.30
180  Poland 1.29
181  Singapore 1.27
182  Portugal 1.24
183  Moldova 1.23
  World
World 2.40
  Not Ranked
1  American Samoa (US)
2  Andorra
3  Aruba (Netherlands)
4  Bermuda (UK)
5  Cayman Islands (UK)
6 Channel Islands –  Guernsey (UK) and  Jersey (UK)
7  Curaçao (Netherlands)
8  Dominica
9  Faroe Islands (Denmark)
10  French Polynesia (France)
11  Greenland (Denmark)
12  Guadeloupe (France)
13  Guam (US)
14  Hong Kong (China)
15  Isle of Man (UK)
16  Kosovo
17  Liechtenstein
18  Macau (China)
19  Marshall Islands
20  Mayotte (France)
21  Micronesia, Federated States of
22  Monaco
23  Northern Mariana Islands (US)
24  Palau
25  Palestinian territories (Gaza Strip and West Bank)
26  San Marino
27  Saint Martin (France) (French part)
28  Sint Maarten (Netherlands) (Dutch part)
29  Slovak Republic /  Slovakia
30  St. Kitts and Nevis
31  Timor-Leste
32  Turks and Caicos Islands UK)
33  Tuvalu
34  United States Virgin Islands (US)
35   Vatican City

Note:

(-) Data unavailable, inapplicable, not collected or country or dependent territory not included. Sovereign states and dependent territories listed by alphabetical order, not ranked.

Source

List of sovereign states and dependent territories by birth rate

Crude birth rate refers to the number of births over a given period divided by the person-years lived by the population over that period.

It is expressed as number of births per 1,000 population.

List of countries by life expectancy

List of countries by median age

Median age is the age that divides a population into two numerically equal groups – that is, half the people are younger than this age and half are older. It is a single index that summarizes the age distribution of a population.

Currently, the median age ranges from a low of about 15 in Niger to 40 or more in several European countries, Canada and Japan. The median age for women tends to be much greater than that of men in some of the ex-Soviet republics, while in the Global South the difference is far smaller or is reversed.

Countries

CIA World Factbook 2018 est.
Country/Territory Rank Average
(Years)
Male
(Years)
Female
(Years)
 Niger 230 15.4 15.3 15.5
 Uganda 229 15.8 15.7 15.9
 Mali 228 15.8 15.1 16.4
 Angola 214 15.9 15.4 16.3
 Malawi 227 16.5 16.4 16.7
 Zambia 226 16.8 16.6 16.9
 Burundi 224 17.0 16.8 17.3
State of Palestine Gaza Strip 225 17.2 16.8 17.5
 Mozambique 222 17.2 16.6 17.8
 South Sudan 223 17.3 17.2 17.5
 Burkina Faso 221 17.3 17.1 17.4
 Tanzania 220 17.7 17.5 18.0
 Liberia 212 17.8 17.5 18.0
 Chad 219 17.8 16.8 18.8
 Ethiopia 218 17.9 17.7 18.1
 Somalia 217 18.1 18.3 17.9
 Benin 216 18.2 17.9 18.6
 Sao Tome and Principe 215 18.4 18.0 18.8
 Nigeria 213 18.4 28.3 18.5
 Cameroon 210 18.5 18.4 18.7
 Gabon 209 18.6 18.4 18.8
 Democratic Republic of the Congo 211 18.6 18.3 18.8
 Senegal 207 18.8 18.0 19.7
 Guinea 205 18.9 18.7 19.1
 East Timor 206 18.9 18.3 19.6
 Afghanistan 208 18.9 18.8 18.9
 Sierra Leone 204 19.0 18.4 19.6
 Rwanda 203 19.0 18.3 19.8
 Yemen 202 19.5 19.3 19.6
 Madagascar 200 19.7 19.5 19.9
 Kenya 199 19.7 19.6 19.9
 Eritrea 201 19.7 19.2 20.1
 Republic of the Congo 193 19.7 19.5 19.8
 Central African Republic 195 19.7 19.4 20.0
 Togo 194 19.8 19.5 20.1
 Equatorial Guinea 197 19.8 19.3 20.3
 Sudan 198 19.9 19.7 20.1
 Comoros 196 19.9 19.2 20.5
 Zimbabwe 189 20.0 19.6 20.4
 Iraq 192 20.0 19.8 20.3
 Guinea-Bissau 191 20.1 19.7 20.6
 Mauritania 190 20.5 19.5 21.4
 Cote d’Ivoire 187 20.9 21.0 20.9
 The Gambia 188 21.0 20.7 21.3
 Western Sahara 183 21.1 20.9 21.3
West Bank West Bank 186 21.1 20.9 21.3
 Ghana 184 21.1 20.6 21.6
 Namibia 185 21.2 20.4 21.9
 Eswatini (Swaziland) 182 21.7 21.5 21.9
 Vanuatu 181 22.0 21.6 22.4
 Guatemala 180 22.1 21.4 22.8
 Solomon Islands 179 22.5 22.3 22.8
 Jordan 178 22.5 22.9 22.0
 Belize 177 22.7 22.5 22.9
 Marshall Islands 173 22.9 22.8 23.0
 Tonga 176 23.0 22.5 23.4
 Laos 172 23.0 22.7 23.3
 Honduras 175 23.0 22.6 23.3
 Haiti 174 23.0 22.7 23.2
 Papua New Guinea 171 23.1 23.2 23.1
 Philippines 169 23.5 23.1 24.0
 Pakistan 168 23.8 23.7 23.8
 Egypt 165 23.9 23.6 24.2
 Djibouti 167 23.9 22.1 25.3
   Nepal 166 24.1 22.8 25.3
 Lesotho 163 24.2 24.2 24.2
 Syria 161 24.3 23.9 24.8
 Bolivia 162 24.3 23.6 25.0
 Samoa 164 24.4 24.1 24.6
 Tajikistan 160 24.5 23.9 25.1
 Botswana 170 24.5 23.5 25.6
 Kiribati 159 24.6 23.8 25.5
 Federated States of Micronesia 158 25.1 24.4 25.8
 Cambodia 157 25.3 24.6 26.0
 Cabo Verde 156 25.4 24.6 26.2
 American Samoa 122 25.5 25.1 26.0
 Oman 153 25.6 26.6 24.2
 Tuvalu 155 25.7 24.7 26.9
 Nicaragua 154 25.7 24.8 26.6
 Jamaica 152 26.0 25.5 26.5
 Guyana 151 26.2 25.9 26.6
 Nauru 150 26.4 27.0 25.7
 Kyrgyzstan 149 26.5 25.4 27.6
 Bangladesh 148 26.7 26.0 27.3
 South Africa 146 27.1 26.9 27.3
 El Salvador 147 27.1 25.6 28.6
 Saudi Arabia 145 27.5 28.2 26.7
 Bhutan 144 27.6 28.2 27.1
 Ecuador 143 27.7 27.0 28.4
 Turkmenistan 142 27.9 27.5 28.4
 Peru 140 28.0 27.2 28.8
 India 141 28.1 27.2 28.6
 Dominican Republic 137 28.1 27.9 28.3
 Algeria 136 28.1 27.8 28.4
 Paraguay 139 28.2 28.0 28.5
 Maldives 138 28.2 28.1 28.3
 Burma 128 28.2 27.4 29.0
 Venezuela 134 28.3 27.6 29.0
 Mongolia 135 28.3 27.5 29.2
 Mexico 133 28.3 27.2 29.4
 Malaysia 131 28.5 28.2 28.8
 Uzbekistan 132 28.6 28.0 29.2
 Libya 130 28.9 29.1 28.7
 Fiji 129 28.9 28.7 29.1
 Guam 111 29.0 28.3 29.7
 Kosovo 127 29.1 28.8 29.5
 Panama 126 29.2 28.8 29.6
 Morocco 125 29.3 28.6 29.9
 Kuwait 124 29.3 30.4 27.4
 Suriname 121 29.8 29.4 30.2
 Israel 119 29.9 29.3 30.6
 Colombia 120 30.0 29.0 31.0
 Indonesia 117 30.2 29.6 30.8
 Brunei 116 30.2 29.7 30.7
 United Arab Emirates 113 30.3 32.1 25.0
 Iran 123 30.3 30.0 30.5
Flag of the United Nations.svgWorld 115 30.4 29.6 31.1
 Vietnam 114 30.5 29.4 31.7
 Lebanon 118 30.5 29.9 31.1
 Kazakhstan 112 30.6 29.3 31.9
 Turkey 110 30.9 30.5 31.4
 Costa Rica 108 31.3 30.8 31.8
 Azerbaijan 107 31.3 29.8 33.0
 Grenada 109 31.5 31.5 31.6
 Tunisia 97 31.6 31.0 32.2
 Argentina 105 31.7 30.5 32.9
 French Polynesia 106 31.9 31.7 32.1
 Antigua and Barbuda 102 31.9 30.0 33.5
 New Caledonia 101 32.0 31.3 32.7
 The Bahamas 100 32.0 30.9 33.2
 Wallis and Futuna 104 32.2 31.3 33.4
 Bahrain 99 32.3 33.8 29.5
 Saint Martin 98 32.5 31.6 33.4
 Brazil 103 32.6 31.1 32.8
 Sri Lanka 96 32.8 31.5 34.0
 Albania 95 32.9 31.6 34.3
 Qatar 90 33.2 34.3 28.1
 Montserrat 94 33.2 32.6 33.7
 Turks and Caicos Islands 92 33.3 33.6 33.0
 Palau 88 33.4 32.7 35.0
 Dominica 89 33.5 33.0 34.0
 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 91 33.6 33.8 33.4
 Northern Mariana Islands 93 33.6 32.8 34.4
 Greenland 86 33.9 35.0 32.7
 North Korea 87 34.0 32.5 35.6
 Chile 85 34.4 33.2 35.6
 Singapore 83 34.6 34.5 34.7
 Gibraltar 81 34.7 33.8 35.7
 Saint Lucia 84 34.8 33.7 36.0
 Anguilla 79 34.8 32.9 36.7
 Uruguay 78 35.0 33.1 36.7
 Saint Kitts and Nevis 82 35.0 35.2 34.8
 Armenia 80 35.1 33.3 36.9
 Mauritius 77 35.3 34.2 36.3
 Seychelles 76 35.4 34.9 36.0
 Trinidad and Tobago 75 36.0 35.6 36.6
 Curacao 73 36.1 33.5 39.7
 Iceland 70 36.5 35.9 37.1
 Cook Islands 74 36.5 36.0 37.0
 British Virgin Islands 72 36.5 36.3 36.6
 Moldova 71 36.7 34.9 38.6
 Ireland 69 36.8 36.4 37.1
 Cyprus 68 36.8 35.5 38.3
 China 67 37.4 36.5 38.4
 Faroe Islands 64 37.6 37.1 38.3
 Thailand 66 37.7 36.6 38.7
 North Macedonia 65 37.9 36.8 39.0
 New Zealand 63 37.9 37.1 38.8
 Jersey 62 38.0 36.3 40.7
 United States 61 38.1 36.8 39.4
 Georgia 60 38.1 35.3 40.9
 Barbados 59 38.6 37.5 39.8
 Australia 58 38.7 37.9 39.5
 Norway 57 39.2 38.4 40.0
 Macau 56 39.3 39.5 39.1
 Luxembourg 54 39.3 38.7 39.9
 Aruba 55 39.3 37.5 41.1
 Russia 53 39.6 36.6 42.5
 Cayman Islands 52 40.0 39.3 40.7
 Belarus 51 40.0 37.1 43.1
 United Kingdom 50 40.5 39.3 41.7
 Slovakia 49 40.5 38.8 42.3
 Ukraine 48 40.6 37.4 43.7
 Taiwan 47 40.7 40.0 41.5
 Poland 46 40.7 39.0 42.4
 Montenegro 45 40.7 39.9 41.8
 Virgin Islands 44 41.0 39.9 41.9
 Sint Maarten 43 41.0 39.9 42.0
 Romania 42 41.1 39.7 42.6
 Sweden 41 41.2 40.2 42.2
 France 40 41.4 39.6 43.1
 Belgium 39 41.4 40.2 42.7
 Puerto Rico 38 41.5 39.5 43.2
 Cuba 37 41.5 40.1 42.6
 South Korea 36 41.8 40.2 43.4
 Malta 35 41.8 40.8 43.0
 Saint Helena, Ascension, and Tristan da Cunha 34 41.9 42.0 41.9
 Czech Republic 33 42.1 40.8 43.4
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 32 42.1 40.5 43.5
 Portugal 31 42.2 40.2 44.4
 Denmark 30 42.2 41.2 43.2
 Canada 29 42.2 40.9 43.5
 Hungary 28 42.3 40.4 44.3
  Switzerland 27 42.4 41.4 43.4
 Finland 26 42.5 40.9 44.3
 Serbia 25 42.6 40.9 44.3
 Netherlands 24 42.6 41.5 43.6
 Spain 23 42.7 41.5 43.9
 Estonia 22 42.7 39.4 46.1
 Bulgaria 21 42.7 40.9 44.7
 EU 20 42.9 41.5 44.3
 Croatia 19 43.0 41.1 45.0
 Liechtenstein 18 43.2 41.7 44.5
 Bermuda 17 43.4 41.5 45.3
 Latvia 16 43.6 39.7 46.9
 Lithuania 15 43.7 39.7 47.1
 Guernsey 14 43.8 42.5 45.1
 Austria 13 44.0 42.8 45.1
 Saint Barthelemy 12 44.1 44.1 44.2
 Isle of Man 11 44.2 43.3 44.9
 Andorra 10 44.3 44.4 44.1
 San Marino 9 44.4 43.3 45.4
 Hong Kong 8 44.4 43.5 45.0
 Slovenia 7 44.5 42.8 46.2
 Greece 6 44.5 43.5 45.6
 Italy 5 45.5 44.4 46.5
 Saint Pierre and Miquelon 4 46.5 46.0 47.0
 Germany 3 47.1 46.0 48.2
 Japan 2 47.3 46.0 48.7
 Monaco 1 53.1 51.7 54.5

Source

Net Migration Rate 2017

Both Environment and Genetic Makeup Influence Behavior

Why Immigration Doesn’t Work

White Flight

World Downfall

The Pine Tree State

The whitest, eldest, and most forested state.

Flag of Maine

Maine (/mn/ (About this soundlisten)) is the northernmost state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. Maine is the 12th smallest by area, the 9th least populous, and the 13th least densely populated of the 50 U.S. states. It is bordered by New Hampshire to the west, the Atlantic Ocean to the southeast, and the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Québec to the northeast and northwest, respectively. Maine is the only state to border just one other state, is the easternmost among the contiguous United States, and is the northernmost state east of the Great Lakes.

The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population of Maine was 1,338,404 on July 1, 2018, a 0.76% increase since the 2010 United States Census. The population density of the state is 41.3 people per square mile, making it the least densely populated state east of the Mississippi River. As of 2010 Maine was also the most rural state in the Union, with only 38.7% of the state’s population living within urban areas. As explained in detail under “Geography”, there are large tracts of uninhabited land in some remote parts of the interior of the state, particularly in the North Maine Woods.

The mean population center of Maine is located in Kennebec County, just east of Augusta. The Greater Portland metropolitan area is the most densely populated with nearly 40% of Maine’s population. This area spans three counties and includes many farms and wooded areas; the 2016 population of Portland proper was 66,937. 

Maine has experienced a very slow rate of population growth since the 1990 census; its rate of growth (0.57%) since the 2010 census ranks 45th of the 50 states. The modest population growth in the state has been concentrated in the southern coastal counties; with more diverse populations slowly moving into these areas of the state. However, the northern, more rural areas of the state have experienced a slight decline in population in recent years. 

According to the 2010 Census, Maine has the highest percentage of non-Hispanic whites of any state, at 94.4% of the total population. In 2011, 89.0% of all births in the state were to non-Hispanic white parents. The table below shows the racial composition of Maine’s population as of 2016.

Maine racial composition of population 
Race Population (2016 est.) Percentage
Total population 1,329,923 100%
White 1,260,476 94.8%
Black or African American 16,303 1.2%
American Indian and Alaska Native 8,013 0.6%
Asian 14,643 1.1%
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 211 0.0%
Some other race 3,151 0.2%
Two or more races 27,126 2.0%

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Maine politics is pretty right leaning according to Mainer News and Main Beacon

Maine gun laws operate on an “Unrestricted” and “Shall Issue” policy. The later being needed for reciprocity with other states. No permit is required to conceal or open carry a firearm if the carrier is 21 years or older and meets all the criteria set out in the law. Permits are still available for residents who wish to travel out-of-state and non-residents. Applications are handled at the state level by the Maine State Police.

Guns To Carry

The coast of Maine near Acadia National Park

Autumn in Stratton

Winter in Bangor

Bates College and Bowdoin College of Lewiston and Brunswick

Biddeford

Bath City Hall

Maine population density map

About USA

From National Justice – New Sheriff in Town by Eric Striker

Muunyayo

Source: https://national-justice.com/new-sheriff-town

Last month, Michael White was acquitted of voluntary manslaughter in the stabbing of Sean Schellenger.

White, who is black, approached and began challenging the 37-year-old white man while he was engaged in a traffic dispute with an unrelated driver in Philadelphia’s Rittenhouse Square.

Witnesses said White and Schellenger both squared up for a fist fight, only for White to pull out a knife and stab the unarmed man in the back with a 12 inch knife. Schellenger died.

The incident was caught on tape, which police used as evidence to charge White with first degree murder.

However, when the races of the two men became public,anti-white activistsbegan a social media campaign claiming White used his weapon in self-defense before any of the facts in the case had come out. It’s worth noting that Pennsylvania is not a Stand-Your-Ground state.

The District Attorney, a Jewish lawyer named…

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Denmark: Nordic Resistance Movement Visits School

Danish Nordic Resistance Movement activists visited a school in the city of Randers last month for a public activity as part of their National Socialist school campaign.

On 25 October activists visited Tirsdalens School in Randers during lunch break hours and held a speech outside with a banner reading, “Danish Youth – Fight for Your Future”.

Many of the pupils wanted to come out and take leaflets, but their panicked teachers stopped them from exiting the building. The teachers pulled down all the blinds in the classrooms to prevent the pupils from seeing the activists’ banner and threw themselves against the doors and bolted them shut.

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