The Lost Forests of New England – Eastern Old Growth

The story of New England’s ancient, old growth forests… what they once were, what changes have taken place across central New England since European settlers arrived, and what our remnant old growth stands look like today.

New England Forests

15 comments

  1. Eternal Anglo Seax · January 16

    When savages manipulate the woods for selfish gain: enlightened.

    When we manipulate the woods for our selfish gain: bad.

    With that being said, I don’t normally do the videos, but this was interesting. The American Basswood is cousin to the Tillia Timentosa, or Silver Linden. I believe. Linden is supposed to have some minor property as a tea.

    Out in the backwoods, where the loggers never went we have some impressive King’s Pines.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Viking Life Blog · January 16

      We don’t have much in regards to old forest here, either.
      Unlike 99,99999 % of non-Whites, we do learn from our mistakes.
      One way to look at it, is that Denmark has less forest because we make food for Sweden, Norway and Germany who has a lot more forest.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 16

        Ironic, given Mark is literally part of Dan. Maine until not long ago had strict conservation laws. I live on old logger’s woods, and you can see how they cleared; they’d purposefully clear plots within the forest allowing for native growth to quickly refill. That’s why where I am you have sections of wicked tall pine and oak, and then everything else is like 40-80ft tall.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 16

        I have worked as a logger for a few months and remember the same. There was a plot where the pine trees were fat and tall. We worked next to that plot, dealing with smaller trees that broke doing a storm.

        I did not use the chainsaw, I moved the trees after they were cut. Some of it was pretty heavy. We had a guy who drove a tractor with a trailer close to where we had collected the wood and then we lifted the wood on the trailer.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 16

        That’s awesome. I’ve felled heavy branches but never whole trees. Where I am I’ve been clearing brush in the woods and raking leaf litter. Doing a Hügel Mound. Takes time but feels good. No ecofascist ever called me a honky. ;P

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 16

        Tree parts that was about 10 cm diameter were cut to maybe 3 meter long, the part that were around 30 cm diameter were cut to maybe 1,5 meter and the part that were 40 cm diameter were cut to maybe a meter, so we could carry them.

        We had a tool to grab one end of a log and pull it over the ground, but we had to load the trailer on our own.
        It was easier to flip fat logs than pull them with the tool, as I remember.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 16

        Makes sense. You know, sometimes carpenters will dig the claw-end of the hammer into big lumber to drag it. Works well enough. But yeah, sometimes flipping your shit is easier. I did that with a clawfoot tub once where I had to drag it a lot of yards to a pit. Flipping, much easier.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 16

        Yes, especially when they get shorter, fatter and heavier.
        The tool was like a scissor claw, I am not even sure it could grab the bigger logs.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 16

        I think I’ve seen one of those. Always thought they’d make a wicked cool post-shtf self defense tool.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 16

        lol, yeah. It also look like something used in a horror movie.

        Like

      • Viking Life Blog · January 16

        I did write scissor claw 🙂 That one look more like a meat hook. Still very cool.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 16

        Touché, you did.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: The Lost Forests of New England – Eastern Old Growth — VikingLifeBlog | Vermont Folk Troth

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