A cheap way to make our own entertainment

I thought about this when I posted Red vs. Blue

Machinima, originally machinema (/məˈʃiːnɪmə, -ˈʃɪn-/) is the use of real-time computer graphics engines to create a cinematic production. Most often, video games are used to generate the computer animation. The word “machinima” is a portmanteau of the words machine and cinema.

Machinima has advantages and disadvantages when compared to other styles of filmmaking. Its relative simplicity over traditional frame-based animation limits control and range of expression. Its real-time nature favors speed, cost saving, and flexibility over the higher quality of pre-rendered computer animation. Virtual acting is less expensive, dangerous, and physically restricted than live action. Machinima can be filmed by relying on in-game artificial intelligence (AI) or by controlling characters and cameras through digital puppetry. Scenes can be precisely scripted, and can be manipulated during post-production using video editing techniques. Editing, custom software, and creative cinematography may address technical limitations. Game companies have provided software for and have encouraged machinima, but the widespread use of digital assets from copyrighted games has resulted in complex, unresolved legal issues.

Comparison to film techniques

Machinima can be less expensive than other forms of filmmaking. Strange Company produced its feature-length machinima film BloodSpell for less than £10,000. Before using machinima, Burnie Burns and Matt Hullum of Rooster Teeth Productions spent US$9,000 to produce a live-action independent film. In contrast, the four Xbox game consoles used to make Red vs. Blue in 2005 cost $600. The low cost caused a product manager for Electronic Arts to compare machinima to the low-budget independent filmThe Blair Witch Project, without the need for cameras and actors. Because these are seen as low barriers to entry, machinima has been called a “democratization of filmmaking”. Berkeley weighs increased participation and a blurred line between producer and consumer against concerns that game copyrights limit commercialization and growth of machinima.

Character and camera control

Kelland, Morris, and Lloyd list four main methods of creating machinima. From simple to advanced, these are: relying on the game’s AI to control most actions, digital puppetry, recamming, and precise scripting of actions. Although simple to produce, AI-dependent results are unpredictable, thus complicating the realization of a preconceived film script. For example, when Rooster Teeth produced The Strangerhood using The Sims 2, a game that encourages the use of its AI, the group had to create multiple instances of each character to accommodate different moods. Individual instances were selected at different times to produce appropriate actions.

In digital puppetry, machinima creators become virtual actors. Each crew member controls a character in real-time, as in a multiplayer game. The director can use built-in camera controls, if available. Otherwise, video is captured from the perspectives of one or more puppeteers who serve as camera operators. Puppetry allows for improvisation and offers controls familiar to gamers, but requires more personnel than the other methods and is less precise than scripted recordings. However, some games, such as the Halo series, (except for Halo PC and Custom Edition, which allow AI and custom objects and characters), allow filming only through puppetry. According to Marino, other disadvantages are the possibility of disruption when filming in an open multi-user environment and the temptation for puppeteers to play the game in earnest, littering the set with blood and dead bodies. However, Chris Burke intentionally hosts This Spartan Life in these unpredictable conditions, which are fundamental to the show. Other works filmed using puppetry are the ILL Clan’s improvisational comedy series On the Campaign Trail with Larry & Lenny Lumberjack and Rooster Teeth Productions’ Red vs. Blue. In recamming, which builds on puppetry, actions are first recorded to a game engine’s demo file format, not directly as video frames. Without re-enacting scenes, artists can then manipulate the demo files to add cameras, tweak timing and lighting, and change the surroundings. This technique is limited to the few engines and software tools that support it.

A technique common in cut scenes of video games, scripting consists of giving precise directions to the game engine. A filmmaker can work alone this way, as J. Thaddeus “Mindcrime” Skubis did in creating the nearly four-hour The Seal of Nehahra (2000), the longest work of machinima at the time. However, perfecting scripts can be time-consuming. Unless what-you-see-is-what-you-get (WYSIWYG) editing is available, as in Vampire: The Masquerade – Redemption, changes may need to be verified in additional runs, and non-linear editing may be difficult. In this respect, Kelland, Morris, and Lloyd compare scripting to stop-motion animation. Another disadvantage is that, depending on the game, scripting capabilities may be limited or unavailable. Matinee, a machinima software tool included with Unreal Tournament 2004, popularized scripting in machinima.

Limitations and solutions

When Diary of a Camper was created, no software tools existed to edit demo files into films. Rangers clan member Eric “ArchV” Fowler wrote his own programs to reposition the camera and to splice footage from the Quake demo file. Quake movie editing software later appeared, but the use of conventional non-linear video editing software is now common. For example, Phil South inserted single, completely white frames into his work No Licence to enhance the visual impact of explosions. In the post-production of Red vs. Blue: The Blood Gulch ChroniclesRooster Teeth Productions added letterboxing with Adobe Premiere Pro to hide the camera player’s head-up display.

Machinima creators have used different methods to handle limited character expression. The most typical ways that amateur-style machinima gets around limitations of expression include taking advantage of speech bubbles seen above players’ heads when speaking, relying on the visual matching between a character’s voice and appearance, and finding methods available within the game itself. Garry’s Mod and Source Filmmaker include the ability to manipulate characters and objects in real-time, though the former relies on community addons to take advantage of certain engine features, and the latter renders scenes using non-real-time effects. In the Halo video game series, helmets completely cover the characters’ faces. To prevent confusion, Rooster Teeth’s characters move slightly when speaking, a convention shared with anime. Some machinima creators use custom software. For example, Strange Company uses Take Over GL Face Skins to add more facial expressions to their characters filmed in BioWare’s 2002 role-playing video game Neverwinter Nights. Similarly, Atussa Simon used a “library of faces” for characters in The Battle of Xerxes. Some software, such as Epic Games’ Impersonator for Unreal Tournament 2004 and Valve‘s Faceposer for Source games, have been provided by the developer. Another solution is to blend in non-machinima elements, as nGame did by inserting painted characters with more expressive faces into its 1999 film Berlin Assassins. It may be possible to point the camera elsewhere or employ other creative cinematography or acting. For example, Tristan Pope combined creative character and camera positioning with video editing to suggest sexual actions in his controversial film Not Just Another Love Story.

Read more at Wikipedia

There are a lot of videos on YouTube made with games like Scum, DayZ and Rust.

Here is a pretty funny video, made with Scum:

Two moons have passed . . . the trials have begun!

Fooster

Here is a “movie” made with DayZ:

I embark on an adventure filled with luck, trust, and action over multiple days to find our revenge. It proved to be much harder than expected…

I’m super pleased with how this video turned out, I hope you all enjoy!

Everything in this video except for the cinematic intro was unscripted and recorded live on Twitch.

SourSweet

Here is a video showing how a server can be found and used, with Rust:

In today’s video I tried to checkout servers that had 0 players on them in the MODDED tab in Rust… I have done this before with the video I Played on 0 Pop Rust Servers (they are wild)… but this time its MODDED! WOO

Brit

Entertainment For Us, By Us

Everything you need to know about Hollywood and why you should boycott it

51 comments

  1. Eternal Anglo Seax · January 18

    Man. It’s a whole wide world out there. Bout the only thing I knew was Blair Witch. Didn’t like it, tbh.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Viking Life Blog · January 18

      I never watched it.
      I hope, that people in the movement would see this post.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 18

        Good! You miss nothing. I’m sure they will.

        I’m kind of a loner in my little circle, which is much smaller than it used to be. But I don’t watch much of anything anymore. I’ve made good on my New Year’s resolutions so far and have been turning wasted time into esoteric reading, business related things, and Danish.

        Occasionally I’ll watch older, better films with friends though. This weekend I got a buddy I’m gonna watch Häxän with.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 18

        Yeah, I should do something similar. I do spend less time on internet and try to be more produktive.

        I did not know of Häxan, but I did know Ib Schønberg. I like ‘Ved kongelunden’ with the two most popular Danish actors.
        I have watched the video on Vimeo (I think):
        https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ved_kongelunden

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 18

        Cool. I was thinking about writing you to ask about Danish film again. I have it in mind to find Riget. Been listening to Danish podcasts off and on to try and inch my comprehension along. Reading kid sentences isn’t enough.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 18

        There use to be Danish movies on YouTube, Vimeo and a movie site, that I use to link to.
        There are some movies and tv series on DR-TV for a limited time.

        Matador:
        https://www.dr.dk/drtv/serie/matador_130149

        Walter og Carlo – op på fars hat:
        https://www.dr.dk/drtv/program/walter-og-carlo-_-op-paa-fars-hat_283623

        Sommer i Tyrol:
        https://www.dr.dk/drtv/program/sommer-i-tyrol_290963

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 19

        Neat. Thanks! Hey, are there any good my films geared toward kids in Danish you’d recommend?

        Like

      • Viking Life Blog · January 19
      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 19

        Awesome. Thanks! I’ve tried to find Walhalla on DVD. Regional codes make it a pain.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 19

        You are welcome!
        I think, the 80s and before is a good time in regards to children entertainment.
        “Reginal codes” is that still a problem, annoying.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 19

        Yeah. I read not long ago that your Queen used to do LOTR illustrations under a pseudonym. I thought that was interesting. She was also in Metalocalypse, although I don’t think by choice. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 19

        Ahh, I did not know any of that. I knew she was drawing (dresses, I guess).

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 19

        It’s a curiosity for me. New England hasn’t had a Queen since Anne. And that’s a few hundred years. Even if maybe Queen Denmark isn’t your best friend it’s kinda cool that your monarchs have those quirks.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 19

        Yeah, I guess so. I don’t really have any strong opinion about the royal family, I just dislike their love for the invasives.

        It is in general good to have hobbies. I have a few, so if one is getting boring or not going well, I always have another to fall back on and enjoy success from.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 19

        That’s the way to do it. I have no right to an opinion, not my family. But, I’d be incredibly annoyed if I had a Queen who wanted to sell my country for parts. From my mind, at least, it’s a lot easier to expect that a monarchy would have strong Nationalist impulses. So I’d assume it would be a bigger betrayal when the Danish or English Queen do globohomo. The American president never stood for any one nation, just a country. And Israel.

        Like

      • Viking Life Blog · January 20

        True.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 20

        Man. There’s a lot of Asterix. I’m starting with Lucky Luke. Subtitulados are in French so it’ll be a good test. Always loved cowboy movies growing up. Hørespil. I like that word.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 20

        Asterix, Tintin, Lucky Luke, etc. from back then are relative free of Cultural Marxism.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 20

        Well, I appreciate the links – I looked through them and am going to borrow the contents from YouTube at some point here.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 20

        Someone uploaded a few episodes of ‘En by i provinsen’ https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCG_GEDvKofdFJ7jK0K1_FaQ/featured

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 20

        A village in the province?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 20

        Yes, Sir. The village/city called Svanbjerg (there is no Svanbjerg in Denmark), sometimes it’s a village with a small harbour and other times it’s a city with regular arpartment buildings and shopping areas, nightlife, etc. (I even think they have an airport, lol).
        The episodes doesn’t carry over much to each other, so it’s more easy to follow.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 20

        Sounds cool. I’ll check that out.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 20

        ‘By’ can be a village, town, city, etc., ‘landsby’ is like a village, ‘storby’ is a “big city”. We only have a few ‘storbyer’ in Denmark, like København, Århus, Ålborg, Odense and Esbjerg.

        ‘Havneby’ is a city with a harbour, all the ‘storbyer’ I mentioned earlier are also ‘havnebyer’. Denmark have a lot of ‘havnebyer’, because we have a lot of coast compared to country size.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 20

        Does ‘by’ replace ‘heim?’ In early New England a great deal of towns were hams. Old English for heim was hām. Windham, Dedham, stuff like that. We also had a lot of burys, (from burg) as in Danbury or Sudbury. A bury can also be a burough, like Scarborough. It’s like that wherever English settlements were, as in Virginia and some of Pennsylvania. And, y’know, (((((((NY)))))))).

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 21

        I am not sure about ‘heim’. I don’t think we use it anymore.
        Burg is borg in Danish, which is a fortress and more or less a castle.
        Fredensborg, Ålborg, Nyborg, Svendborg (in Denmark), Helsingborg (in East-Denmark/Sweden), Flensborg (in South Denmark/Germany) for example.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 21

        Neat. Thanks. Wish we had castles. Ain’t none in Scarborough, I can tell you that. Danbury does mean “Fortress of the Danes” though.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 21

        ‘Danbury’ “Fortress of the Danes”

        I like that, very much.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 21

        Thought you might. Needs more Dane though. It’s in New Hampshire. I have a post you’ve read but I think I added the links after. https://ne1p01.wordpress.com/2021/08/07/danbury/

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 21

        Ah, yes. I remember. I even shared it, here.

        Anti-Germanicism and the attempt to completely ignore our history, effect us all.
        We have so much in common and have created more than all the other races, combined.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 21

        Yup. Agreed. It really struck home for me reading Grønbech. One, guy is Danish. Yeah, I have to read him in English: but I couldn’t shake a feeling of kinship to the man. I don’t always say that about reading books from people. And, the way he writes about the English is interesting because he does not categorise them separately as if they were anything other than displaced extensions of Scandinavia – no alienation, no nothing. One race, Teutonic Race. Wasn’t so long ago he or Madison Grant wrote, and had some overlapping ideas.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 21

        Good point. Uncle H was doing the same, which properly is the main reason for anti-Germanicism today.

        One of the unique things about Germanic people is, that we create countries and societies that everybody want to live in.
        Something even the Celts can not say, which might have played a role in their submission to Germanic people.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 21

        This is true. I’ll say the Celts have done amazing things, and they have beautiful cultures. But infrastructure in a streamlined way is not where they succeed, and there’s a good reason they never had Empires. Not that Empires are the end-all be-all, just a watermark of successful forward planning. Maybe. Unless you count France, but theirs is a result of hybridising Celtic and Germanic culture as I understand it, much in the way “Britain” is a melting pot of Celtic and Germanic. In an ideal world we’d all be able to put aside the squabbles and put our monies where our mouths are. Saying no to ZOG. Like you say, we’re all in this together. (How do you say that in Danish?)

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 21

        I agree.

        We usually say ‘vi er alle i samme båd’.
        We are all in the same boat!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 21

        Neat. Vi siger det ogsa på Maine. I actually use that saying a lot.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 21

        Yeah, I have heard it in English too.

        Maine also have a strong coast-culture like UK, Netherlands and Scandinavia.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 21

        Maritime Nationalism, bruh.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 21

        True!
        🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 21

        ‘By’ might come from ‘bygd’, which I guess is translated into hamlet.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 21

        Cool beans. Thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 21

        You are welcome.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eternal Anglo Seax · January 18

        88min long. Nice.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 18

        lol, yeah.

        Like

      • Viking Life Blog · January 18

        Huset På Christianshavn (85 episodes)

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Otto+K.+Forssell · January 18

    Machinima (Machine + Cinema) started in 1997 with two Quake clans – Strange Company & ILL Clan within the third party Mod “Quake Worlds” a comprehensive map & NPC editing suite which allowed a small niche of Quake fans to make movies. Strange Company later founded “Machinima dot com” in the early 2000s before the rights were sold off & the platform is now unrecognizable (if they still even exist), likewise Strange Company vanished from the scene, whereas Ill Clan lead by “ILL Will” sold out massively, rebranded as “Pixel Valley Studio” & partnered with “Linden Lab” (the point of no return) by which sealed their dissolution.

    Needless to say, I don’t keep up with Machinma anymore, as the founders were co-opted long ago & the corporate gaming world very much has a foothold upon Machinima creation especially now with the vast advancement of game engine technology & third party video suites.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Viking Life Blog · January 21

    It looks like people can make their own server and do as they like.

    Like

    • Viking Life Blog · January 21

      Like

    • Otto+K.+Forssell · January 21

      Private servers have always existed for “any” online game this can be for better or for worse it really depends on the type of person who is hosting the private server, considering that if you choose this route you are committing at the mercy of many hackers.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Viking Life Blog · January 21

        Yeah, you are properly right. Maybe one could make an invite only server.
        I noticed that players use Discord or something similar, that would be a good way to avoid being moderated on puplic server who will ban people using the n-word, etc..

        Like

  4. Viking Life Blog · February 18

    Like

  5. Viking Life Blog · 14 Days Ago

    Like

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