How Three Million Germans Mass Murdered after Destruction of the Reich

Nigel Jones reviews After the Reich: From the Liberation of Vienna to the Berlin Airlift by Giles MacDonogh.

Giles MacDonogh is a historian of wine and gastronomy, but in this book, pursuing his other consuming interest – German history – he serves a dish to turn the strongest of stomachs. It makes particularly uncomfortable reading for those who compare the disastrous occupation of Iraq unfavourably to the post-war settlement of Germany and Austria.

MacDonogh argues that the months that followed May 1945 brought no peace to the shattered skeleton of Hitler’s Reich, but suffering even worse than the destruction wrought by the war. After the atrocities in Europe, some degree of justified vengeance was inevitable, but the appalling bestialities that MacDonogh documents so soberly went far beyond that. The first 200 pages of his brave book are an almost unbearable chronicle of human suffering.

His best estimate is that some three million Germans died unnecessarily after the official end of hostilities. A million soldiers vanished before they could creep back to the holes that had been their homes. The majority of them died in Soviet captivity (of the 90,000 who surrendered at Stalingrad, only 5,000 eventually came home) but, shamingly, many thousands perished as prisoners of the Anglo-Americans. Herded into cages along the Rhine, with no shelter and very little food, they dropped like flies. Others, more fortunate, toiled as slave labour in a score of Allied countries, often for years. Incredibly, some Germans were still being held in Russia as late as 1979.

The two million German civilians who died were largely the old, women and children: victims of disease, cold, hunger, suicide – and mass murder.

Apart from the well-known repeated rape of virtually every girl and woman unlucky enough to be in the Soviet occupation zones, perhaps the most shocking outrage recorded by MacDonogh – for the first time in English – is the slaughter of a quarter of a million Sudeten Germans by their vengeful Czech compatriots. The survivors of this ethnic cleansing, naked and shivering, were pitched across the border, never to return to their homes. Similar scenes were seen across Poland, Silesia and East Prussia as age-old German communities were brutally expunged.

It may be asked why the western Allies did not stop this venting of long-dammed-up rage on the innocent. MacDonogh’s answer is that it could all have been even worse. The US Treasury Secretary, Henry Morgenthau, favoured turning Germany into a gigantic farm, and there were genocidal schemes afoot to starve, sterilise or deport the population of what was left of the bombed-out cities.

The discovery of the contentration camps stoked Allied fury, but the surviving inmates were soon replaced by German captives – Dachau, Buchenwald, Sachsenhausen and even Auschwitz stayed in business after the war, only now with the Germans behind the wire.

Read more here at Daily Archives

Read about WWII here

Truth Fears No Investigation

MP 40 – Role & “Tactics”

A look at the role of MP 40 (and its very similar “predecessor” the MP 38) in terms of role and tactics within the German Army in the Second World War. For this we look at German Army regulations, reports, tables of organization and equipment and also the weapons themselves. We look at the relation of the MP 40 submachine-gun to the Panzerwaffe, but also as its use by the infantry, particularly the squad leader, platoon leader and company commander.

MP 40 AYF 3.JPG

Proto-Germanic language

“The Proto-Germanic language developed in southern Scandinavia (Denmark, south Sweden and southern Norway), the Urheimat (original home) of the Germanic tribes.”  [in other words, Denmark]

Proto-Germanic (abbreviated PGmc; also called Common Germanic) is the reconstructed proto-language of the Germanic branch of the Indo-European languages.

Proto-Germanic developed from pre-Proto-Germanic into three branches during the first half of the first millennium of the Common EraWest GermanicEast Germanic and North Germanic, which however remained in contact over a considerable time, especially the Ingvaeonic languages (including English), which arose from West Germanic dialects and remained in continued contact with North Germanic.

A defining feature of Proto-Germanic is the completion of the process described by Grimm’s law, a set of sound changes that occurred between its status as a dialect of Proto-Indo-European and its gradual divergence into a separate language. As it is probable that the development of this sound shift spanned a considerable time (several centuries), Proto-Germanic cannot adequately be reconstructed as a simple node in a tree model but rather represents a phase of development that may span close to a thousand years. The end of the Common Germanic period is reached with the beginning of the Migration Period in the fourth century.

The alternative term “Germanic parent language” may be used to include a larger scope of linguistic developments, spanning the Nordic Bronze Age and Pre-Roman Iron Age in Northern Europe (second to first millennia BC) to include “Pre-Germanic” (PreGmc), “Early Proto Germanic” (EPGmc) and “Late Proto-Germanic” (LPGmc). While Proto-Germanic refers only to the reconstruction of the most recent common ancestor of Germanic languages, the Germanic parent language refers to the entire journey that the dialect of Proto-Indo-European that would become Proto-Germanic underwent through the millennia.

The Proto-Germanic language is not directly attested by any coherent surviving texts; it has been reconstructed using the comparative method. Fragmentary direct attestation exists of (late) Common Germanic in early runic inscriptions (specifically the second-century AD Vimose inscriptions and the second-century BC Negau helmet inscription), and in Roman Empire era transcriptions of individual words (notably in Tacitus‘ Germaniac. 90 CE).

Map of the pre-Roman Iron Age in Northern Europe showing cultures associated with Proto-Germanic, c. 500 BC. The red shows the area of the preceding Nordic Bronze Age in Scandinavia; the magenta-colored area towards the south represents the Jastorf culture of the North German Plain.

Wikipedia

Red with a white cross that extends to the edges of the flag; the vertical part of the cross is shifted to the hoist side

Germanic People

Danes

Nationwide Genomic Study in Denmark Reveals Remarkable Population Homogeneity

Why does Old English sound like Danish?

English Words with Old Norse Origins

The North Germanic Languages of the Nordic Nations

Nynorsk and Bokmål: Why are there two ways to write Norwegian?

Bornholmsk Dialect

Scanian Dialect

Anglish – What if English Were 100% Germanic?

Why Danish sounds funny to Scandinavians

Isolated People in Sweden Used Runes Up Until The 20th Century

Scandinavians, Why Do They All Have the Same Name?

The German Language

How to tell apart Danish, German and Dutch

How to tell apart Dutch, Afrikaans and Frisian

 

 

Voting in the Council of the European Union – Germanic vs Non-Germanic

Countries like Spain, Poland and  Romania has more votes than Netherlands.

Greece, Portugal, Czech Rep. and Hungary has more votes than Sweden and Austria.

Bulgaria has more votes than Denmark.

Why do these freeloaders have more influence than those who contribute the most?

Net contributors to the EU budget

Which Countries Are the Biggest Boost or Drag on the EU Budget?

Image result for VikingLifeBlog

The voting system of the Council as defined in the Treaty of Nice entered into force on 1 February 2003. The voting weights of the member states according to this treaty are shown in the table on the right. The voting system was replaced by the Treaty of Lisbon, effective 1 November 2014.

After the accession of Croatia, on 1 July 2013, at least 260 votes out of a total of 352 by at least 15 member states were required for legislation to be adopted by qualified majority. Croatia had 7 votes (the same as Denmark, Ireland, Lithuania, Slovakia and Finland).[24]

From 1 July 2013, the pass condition translated into:

  1. At least 15 (or 18, if proposal was not made by the Commission) countries,
  2. At least 260 of the total 352 voting weights,
  3. At least 313.6 million people represented by the states that vote in favour.
Population in millions as of 1 January 2003 (Treaty of Nice)
Member state Population Weights Penrose
 Germany 82.54m 16.5% 29 8.4% 9.55%
 France 59.64m 12.9% 29 8.4% 8.11%
 UK 59.33m 12.4% 29 8.4% 8.09%
 Italy 57.32m 12.0% 29 8.4% 7.95%
 Spain 41.55m 9.0% 27 7.8% 6.78%
 Poland 38.22m 7.6% 27 7.8% 6.49%
 Romania 21.77m 4.3% 14 4.1% 4.91%
 Netherlands 17,02m 3.3% 13 3.8% 4.22%
 Greece 11.01m 2.2% 12 3.5% 3.49%
 Portugal 10.41m 2.1% 12 3.5% 3.39%
 Belgium 10.36m 2.1% 12 3.5% 3.38%
 Czech Rep. 10.20m 2.1% 12 3.5% 3.35%
 Hungary 10.14m 2.0% 12 3.5% 3.34%
 Sweden 8.94m 1.9% 10 2.9% 3.14%
 Austria 8.08m 1.7% 10 2.9% 2.98%
 Bulgaria 7.85m 1.5% 10 2.9% 2.94%
 Denmark 5.38m 1.1% 7 2.0% 2.44%
 Slovakia 5.38m 1.1% 7 2.0% 2.44%
 Finland 5.21m 1.1% 7 2.0% 2.39%
 Ireland 3.96m 0.9% 7 2.0% 2.09%
 Lithuania 3.46m 0.7% 7 2.0% 1.95%
 Latvia 2.33m 0.5% 4 1.2% 1.61%
 Slovenia 2.00m 0.4% 4 1.2% 1.48%
 Estonia 1.36m 0.3% 4 1.2% 1.23%
 Cyprus 0.72m 0.2% 4 1.2% 0.89%
 Luxembourg 0.45m 0.1% 4 1.2% 0.70%
 Malta 0.40m 0.1% 3 0.9% 0.66%
 EU 484.20m 100% 345 100% 100%

Read more here at Wikipedia

The Making of the United States of Europe

A 1994 view on “the incumbent poor four” and “the eastern enlargement”.

Eastern Europe is our Mexico!

“I Survived the Bombing of Dresden and Continue to Believe it was a War Crime”

As a prisoner of war held in Dresden, I still suffer the memories of those terrible events and my anger refuses to subside.

As the incendiaries fell, the phosphorus clung to the bodies of those below, turning them into human torches. The screaming of those who were being burned alive was added to the cries of those not yet hit. There was no need for flares to lead the second wave of bombers to their target, as the whole city had become a gigantic torch. It must have been visible to the pilots from a hundred miles away. Dresden had no defences, no anti-aircraft guns, no searchlights, nothing.

Read more here at Daily Archives

Dresden 1945: The Devil’s Tinderbox

Dresden was a civilian town with no military significance. Why did they burn its people?

Bombing of Dresden in World War II

Anniversary of Dresden firebombing

Apocalypse at Dresden: The Long Suppressed Story of the Worst Massacre in History

Burning Hell: Bombing Holocaust of Hamburg by British Air Force (1943)

Allied Use of Delay-Action Bombs (aka Long-Term Chemical Detonator Bombs) and their Effects.

WW2 Bombings Claimed 60,000 French Lives: Almost All Died at the Hands of the Allies

HITLER DROPPED PEACE LEAFLETS / CHURCHILL DROPPED BOMBS

British Empire in World War II

Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill – ENGLAND’S TARNISHED HERO

How Wealthy Jews Bribed and Controlled Winston Churchill

Everything People Believed about Hitler’s Intentions Toward Britain was a Myth Created by Churchill.

BBC Four documentary reveals friendship between Churchill and a Jewish film producer

Winston the spendaholic: He teetered on the brink of bankruptcy and was saved by secret backhanders. Yet a “new” book on Churchill’s finances reveals he spent £40,000 a year on casinos and £54,000 on booze.

Bundesarchiv Bild 146-1994-041-07, Dresden, zerstörtes Stadtzentrum.jpg

The truth fears no investigation

Read about WWII here

Tiger Logistics: How to feed a German Cat

Logistics of the Tiger Battalions or how to feed your cat. We all know that the Panzerkampfwagen VI Ausführung E was a high-maintenance cat, yet, how much actually? For this we look at fuel consumption and the sources here differ widely. We also compare the Tiger’s values to that of the Panzerkampfwagen IV Ausführung H. For data we look at the British reports on Tiger 131, German sources, Jentz & Doyle, Friedli and other authors as well. Of course, we also look at the Tiger Fibel (Tiger Primer), since it contains some interesting aspects as well, particularly when it comes to armor and oil.

Military History not Visualized

Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-299-1805-16, Nordfrankreich, Panzer VI (Tiger I).2.jpg

Repairing Tigers

Why 879 Men for 45 Tigers?

Read about WWII here

 

Liberating Dachau 1945

The story of the complex events that occurred during liberation of Dachau Camp by the US Army in April 1945.

Schloss Itter.JPG

Itter Castle (GermanSchloss Itter) is a 19th-century castle in Itter, a village in TyrolAustria. In 1943, during World War II, it was turned into a prison for French VIPs. The castle was the site of an extraordinary instance of the U.S. Army, German Wehrmacht, Austrian Resistance, and the prisoners themselves fighting side-by-side against the Waffen-SS in the Battle for Castle Itter in early May 1945 prior to the end of the war.

The hill castle is located atop a 666-metre (2,185 ft) knoll at the entrance to the Brixental valley, about 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) south of Wörgl and 20 kilometres (12 mi) west of Kitzbühel.

Read more here at Wikipedia

The Battle for Castle Itter (German: Schlacht um Schloss Itter) was fought in the Austrian North Tyrol village of Itter on 5 May 1945, in the last days of the European Theater of World War II.

Troops of the 23rd Tank Battalion of the 12th Armored Division of the US XXI Corps led by Captain John C. “Jack” Lee, Jr., a number of Wehrmacht soldiers led by Major Josef “Sepp” Gangl, SS-Hauptsturmführer Kurt-Siegfried Schrader, and recently freed French prisoners of war defended Castle Itter against an attacking force from the 17th SS Panzergrenadier Division until relief from the American 142nd Infantry Regiment of the 36th Division of XXI Corps arrived.

The French prisoners included former prime ministers, generals and a tennis star. It is the only known time during the war in which Americans and Germans fought side-by-side. Popular accounts of the battle have called it the strangest battle of World War II.

Read more here at Wikipedia

The truth fears no investigation

Read about WWII here

The Future Calls

EIGHTY-THREE years ago this month, a child was born in the small Austrian town of  Braunau on the River Inn.  With His arrival on this Earth, there began a new era in human history.  For He was more than just another man.  Into a world which had lost its sense of direction, He came to show the Way.

Read more here at National Vanguard

Repairing Tigers

Maintaining and repairing the Panzerkampfwagen VI Ausführung E Tiger was a big deal, yet, usually the topic is discussed by mentioning the interleaving track wheels and then moving on. Here we look a bit closer, namely the organization of the maintenance units, which unit was responsible for what. Additionally, some of the equipment like trucks and halftracks with cranes are mentioned, as are gantry cranes and the use of the Bergepanther. The interleaving track wheels also get an illustration in terms of how complicated it was to change them.

Military History not Visualized

Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-299-1805-16, Nordfrankreich, Panzer VI (Tiger I).2.jpg

1 Tiger Tank vs 50 T-34s – A True Story

The Tiger Tank That Wouldn’t Die

Wounded Tiger Tanks vs. US Halftracks

Panther Ambush – Normandy 1944

Panther vs Sherman – Operation Nordwind 1945

Jagdpanther vs. Churchill – Normandy 1944

Tiger Ambush – Normandy 1944

Jagdtiger Ambush – Ardennes 1944

Jagdtiger Ambush 1945!

SS King Tiger Last Stand: Berlin 1945

Tiger I and Stug III in the Battle of Narva (February, 1944)

Ferdinands/Elefants on the Eastern Front

About German WWII Tanks – Panther and Jagdtiger

About King Tiger (Tiger II)

Tiger I

The Great Tiger We All Know And Love

How effective was the Tiger I and Tiger II really?

King Tiger: Why NO MG-42, but MG-34?

8.8 cm KwK 43 and 8.8 cm Pak 43

Same Size Different Round

How to use a Sturmtiger

Panzer Tactics – “Blitzkrieg” Years – Platoon

German Division (World War 2)

Organisation of a Panzer Division

Organisation of a SS Panzer Division

Why 879 Men for 45 Tigers?

Schwere Panzer-Abteilung

The PanzerKompanie

German Tank Production in World War 2

Read about WWII here