Social Contract

From Wikipedia, so take it with a grain of salt!

In moral and political philosophy, the social contract is a theory or model that originated during the Age of Enlightenment and usually concerns the legitimacy of the authority of the state over the individual.

Social contract arguments typically are that individuals have consented, either explicitly or tacitly, to surrender some of their freedoms and submit to the authority (of the ruler, or to the decision of a majority) in exchange for protection of their remaining rights or maintenance of the social order. The relation between natural and legal rights is often a topic of social contract theory.

The starting point for most social contract theories is an examination of the human condition absent of any political order (termed the “state of nature” by Thomas Hobbes). In this condition, individuals’ actions are bound only by their personal power and conscience. From this shared starting point, social contract theorists seek to demonstrate why rational individuals would voluntarily consent to give up their natural freedom to obtain the benefits of political order.

The central assertion that social contract theory approaches is that law and political order are not natural, but human creations. The social contract and the political order it creates are simply the means towards an end—the benefit of the individuals involved—and legitimate only to the extent that they fulfill their part of the agreement. Hobbes argued that government is not a party to the original contract and citizens are not obligated to submit to the government when it is too weak to act effectively to suppress factionalism and civil unrest.

According to other social contract theorists, when the government fails to secure their natural rights (Locke) or satisfy the best interests of society (called the “general will” by Rousseau), citizens can withdraw their obligation to obey or change the leadership through elections or other means including, when necessary, violence. Locke believed that natural rights were inalienable, and therefore the rule of God superseded government authority, while Rousseau believed that democracy (majority-rule) was the best way to ensure welfare while maintaining individual freedom under the rule of law. The Lockean concept of the social contract was invoked in the United States Declaration of Independence.

Read more at Wikipedia

Ethnicity and Territory

Prosperity vs Security

An unavoidable conflict

We are not the aggressor!

About the consequence of mass repatriation

About Mass-Immigration and Objectivity

Changes are much needed!

Stay the Course

Breaking a Vicious Cycle

Group cohesiveness

Identity Politics

Cultural Rights

Ethnostate

Monoculturalism

Ethnic Heterogeneity

Diversity and Social Trust

High trust and low trust societies

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White Flight

White Mans Burden

The End of the Welfare State

Societal Collapse

Second-class citizen

Deaths of despair

Quality of life

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The Frankfurt School and Critical Theory – Cultural Marxism

Neo-Marxism

The Four stages of ideological subversion

The long march through the institutions

Rules for Radicals

Divide and Rule

Ruling Class

Fifth Column

Controlled Opposition

Psychological Warfare

Psychological Manipulation

False Flag

About Globohomo

Both Environment and Genetic Makeup Influence Behavior

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Ten Stages of Genocide

Genocide Convention

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP)

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Crimes against humanity

Weapon of Mass Migration

White genocide is not a conspiracy theory!

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Værnemager

Landsforræder

Loss of general trust

Aggravating Circumstance

Danish “Collaborator” Trials

Nationalization of Anti-White Businesses

Infiltration, Undermining and Exploitation

Before The “Collaborator” Trials: When Murder Became Legal

The Decline of the Danish population

Auxiliary Cruiser Badge

The Auxiliary Cruiser War Badge (GermanKriegsabzeichen für Hilfskreuzer) was a World War II German military decoration awarded to officers and men of the Kriegsmarine for service on Auxiliary Cruisers or the supply ships that supported them for a successful large voyage. The award was instituted on 24 April 1941 by Grand Admiral Erich Raeder.

Design

Designed by Wilhelm Ernst Peekhaus in Berlin, the award featured a Viking longship sailing over the northern hemisphere of the globe surrounded by a laurel wreath of oak leaves. At the apex of the badge was a German Eagle clutching a swastika. The wreath, eagle and ship were in gilt and the globe area gray coloured. Versions were produced in bronze and later in zinc.

A special presentation version, featuring 15 small diamonds inlaid on the swastika, was presented in January 1942 by Grand Admiral Raeder to Kapitän zur See Bernhard Rogge, commander of the successful German auxiliary cruiser Atlantis.

Wikipedia

Related:

List of Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross recipients

The Iron Cross & The Knight’s Cross

German Cross

Close Combat Clasp

Eastern Medal

German War Merit Cross (WWII Medal)

German Individual Combat Skills Awards World War 2 1939-1945

The Rarest German WWII Medal? 20th July 1944 Wound Badge

Bandit-Warfare Badge

U-boat War Badge

U-boat Front Clasp

High Seas Fleet Badge

Blockade Runner Badge

German Waffen SS Cuff titles

German World War II commerce raiders

German Merchant Raiders of WW2 – Gentleman Raiders of the High Seas

The Real-Life German Pirates – WW2 Special

Karl Dönitz

Read about WWII here

Blockade Runner Badge

The Blockade Runner Badge or the Badge for Blockade Runners (GermanAbzeichen für Blockadebrecher) was a World War II German military decoration awarded for service on warships or merchant vessels that attempted to break through the British Blockade of Germany (1939–1945). It was instituted on 1 April 1941 upon the order of Adolf Hitler and first awarded on 1 July of the same year to Hugo Olendorff.

The badge was worn on the left breast pocket of the uniform. A smaller half-size version was awarded for use by civilians and members of the merchant marine.

Wikipedia

Related:

List of Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross recipients

The Iron Cross & The Knight’s Cross

German Cross

Close Combat Clasp

Eastern Medal

German War Merit Cross (WWII Medal)

German Individual Combat Skills Awards World War 2 1939-1945

The Rarest German WWII Medal? 20th July 1944 Wound Badge

Bandit-Warfare Badge

U-boat War Badge

U-boat Front Clasp

High Seas Fleet Badge

German Waffen SS Cuff titles

German World War II commerce raiders

German Merchant Raiders of WW2 – Gentleman Raiders of the High Seas

The Real-Life German Pirates – WW2 Special

Karl Dönitz

Read about WWII here

High Seas Fleet Badge

The High Seas Fleet Badge (GermanDas Flottenkriegsabzeichen), also known as High Seas Fleet War Badge, was a World War IIGerman military decoration awarded for service to the crews of the Kriegsmarine High Seas Fleet, mainly of the battleships and cruisers, but also those ships that supported them operationally for which there was no other award given. Although the award was instituted in April 1941, it could be awarded for actions that took place prior to this date. It was “primarily in recognition of the sea struggle” against the British fleet.

Description

The medal had an outer gold laurel wreath of oak leaves with the German Eagle at the top, while clutching a swastika. In the center was a “forward sailing battleship” in grey. The badge was worn on the lower part of the left breast pocket of the naval service tunic, underneath the 1st class Iron Cross, if awarded.

Criteria for award

To be eligible to receive the badge one must have 12 weeks service on a battleship or cruiser, with proof of distinction and good conduct. The number of weeks were reduced if one of these conditions were met:

  • If the recipient was wounded or killed during the voyage.
  • Outstanding achievements in a naval engagement.
  • Individual’s ship was sunk in action. (BismarckAdmiral Graf SpeeBlücher)
  • For participation in the sinking of HMS Rawalpindi by Scharnhorst and Gneisenau and the sinking of two merchant vessels south of Jan Mayen by Deutschland.
  • All crew members of the Scharnhorst and Gneisenau received the award in view of the operational effectiveness of the ships.
  • To every sailor who was present on the Tirpitz when it was bombed and sunk by the British R.A.F. in Tromsø Fjord on 12 November, 1944.

Wikipedia

Related:

List of Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross recipients

The Iron Cross & The Knight’s Cross

German Cross

Close Combat Clasp

Eastern Medal

German War Merit Cross (WWII Medal)

German Individual Combat Skills Awards World War 2 1939-1945

The Rarest German WWII Medal? 20th July 1944 Wound Badge

Bandit-Warfare Badge

U-boat War Badge

U-boat Front Clasp

German Waffen SS Cuff titles

German WWII Ship Classes

Karl Dönitz

Read about WWII here

Why Hitler declared War on the USA

Why did Hitler declare war on the United States in December 1941? The Red Army was counter-attacking on the Eastern Front, the treaty with the Japanese did not require him to declare war and previously he avoided hostilities with the United States repeatedly and instructed particularly the Kriegsmarine to “stand down”. So why did Hitler declare war now? This video features Dr. Klaus Schmider from the Royal Military Academy in Sandhurst who researched this topics over the last few years.

Military History Visualized

The Rainbow nation (USA) was never neutral. They wanted to spread the Rainbow flag, together with their Rainbow allies.

The Rainbow Alliance was UK, USA, Soviet Union (Russia) and countries like Poland, France, China and Mexico fighting against Germany and the Germanic Race.

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The Rainbow Alliance I & II

The Rainbow Alliance (WWII)

Know Your History: Weimar Germany (1919-1933)

Know Your History: The First Trans-Clinic in the World was Jewish (and the National Socialists Burned it Down)

The Frankfurt School

The Book Burnings

How German Women Suffered Largest Mass Rape in History by Soviets

American WWII GIs Were Dangerous Sex-Crazed Rapists, Explosive Book Claims

French, British and American Soldiers Raped almost One Million German Women after World War II

GIs, Souvenir Hunting, and Looting in Germany, 1945

The Dark Side of the “Liberation of Europe”

The “Greatest Generation”

America vs Germany 1941 – The Forgotten Conflict

How FDR Forced Hitler To Declare War on America.

Adolf Hitler: England Does Not Want Peace – 8th November 1939

Britain Intended War before Hitler Invaded Poland

Why didn’t the Allies declare war on the USSR when they invaded Poland?

DESPERATE DECEPTION: BRITISH COVERT OPERATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES, 1939-44

HITLER DROPPED PEACE LEAFLETS / CHURCHILL DROPPED BOMBS

A MOST UNCIVILIZED MEANS OF WARFARE – Genocidal British Bombing Policy During World War II

British Empire in World War II

Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill – ENGLAND’S TARNISHED HERO

How Wealthy Jews Bribed and Controlled Winston Churchill

Everything People Believed about Hitler’s Intentions Toward Britain was a Myth Created by Churchill.

BBC Four documentary reveals friendship between Churchill and a Jewish film producer

Winston the spendaholic: He teetered on the brink of bankruptcy and was saved by secret backhanders. Yet a “new” book on Churchill’s finances reveals he spent £40,000 a year on casinos and £54,000 on booze.

Dresden: Death from Above

Dresden 1945: The Devil’s Tinderbox

Dresden was a civilian town with no military significance. Why did they burn its people?

Dresden was a civilian town with no military significance.

Bombing of Dresden in World War II

Anniversary of Dresden firebombing

Apocalypse at Dresden: The Long Suppressed Story of the Worst Massacre in History

“I Survived the Bombing of Dresden and Continue to Believe it was a War Crime”

77 Years Ago Today Churchill Incinerated 100,000 Defenseless Civilians in Dresden

Jews Smear Germans Who Commemorate Allied Terror Bombing Of Dresden As ‘Neo-Nazis’

Burning Hell: Bombing Holocaust of Hamburg by British Air Force (1943)

Allied Use of Delay-Action Bombs (aka Long-Term Chemical Detonator Bombs) and their Effects.

How Britain Forced The Invasion of Norway & Denmark By Germany Then Blamed Hitler, Again.

The British invasion of Denmark and the ‘Stab in the Back’.

The Forgotten (and Flawed) British Invasion of Iceland (Denmark) – Operation Fork (May, 1940)

About the Allied Bombing of Denmark

The Soviet Occupation of Bornholm

Rønne Harbour After the Russians Attacked 1945

The Ugly Truth About the Nuremberg Tribunals

Public to Get Access to Nuremberg Trials Digital Recordings

The SADISTIC Executioner Of Nuremberg – John C Woods

Nuremberg Executions 1946 – What Happened to the Bodies?

Congress Awards Gold Medal To Jewish Nuremberg Prosecutor Who Used Torture And Death Threats To Extract ‘Confessions’ From German Defendants

Did Britain Torture Germans? The London Cage Controversy

The Tokyo Trials – How America Sabotaged Justice in the Far East, 1945-58

The Great Patents Heist

Ransacking The Reich

The Sacking of Defeated Germany

Operation Paperclip: The US Plan for German Scientists After World War II

German War Reparations

Erasing Hitler – How The Allies Cleansed Germany of Nationalism

How Fanta was Invented in NS Germany

Germany Army: Quality or Quantity? – In 1943-44 Germany spend just 6 % of its resources on tanks dealing with Soviet Union and more than 40 % of its resources on airplanes mostly dealing with USA and UK.

Why determining the Impact of Lend-Lease is so complicated

Did the Soviets win WW2 due to US Support?

Lend-Lease Program

The end of US neutrality? The Lend-Lease Act

German Soldiers of World War II: Why They Were the Best, and Why They Still Lost

Why was the Wehrmacht so Combat Effective?

German Army: Why No Collapse

Why the German Army failed in the West 43-44

The MAIN Reason Why Germany Lost WW2 – OIL

Read about WWII here

U-boat Front Clasp

The U-boat Front Clasp (GermanU-Boot-Frontspange) or U-boat Combat Clasp, was a World War II German Kriegsmarine military decoration awarded to holders of the U-boat War Badge to recognize continued combat service and valor.

History

The award was instituted on 15 May 1944 to bring the U-boat force in line with other branches of the German armed forces, all of which had a similar award to recognize valor. There were no specified merits for earning the award; decoration was based on the recommendations of the U-boat commander and subject to approval by Karl Dönitz. Awards were often due to the number of patrols completed or demonstrations of valor in combat. The clasp was worn on the upper left breast.

Design

Wilhelm Ernst Peekhaus of Berlin submitted the design of the badge, which consisted of a central laurel wreath with a stylized submarine and wings of oak leaves. The wings on either side consisted of six staggered oak leaves (for a total of twelve). Two crossed swords decorated the bottom of the central wreath; the submarine in the middle mimicked the design of the U-Boat War Badge. The wreath integrated an eagle with turned down wings holding a swastika. After the war ended, sailors in Germany could only wear the medal if it did not include National Socialist emblems – in keeping with the German Ordensgesetz. An alternative design with a complete laurel wreath (without eagle and swastika) with a centered submarine emblem exist for this purpose.

Classes

The award was bestowed in two classes. The classes of the badge were manufactured in bronze, or silver.

  • Bronze – the lower grade and awarded based on the number of war patrols, the degree of risks involved in the mission and for personal bravery
  • Silver – on 24 November 1944, the silver class was introduced to further recognize bronze holders with continued merits, increased risk and acts of valor

Source: Wikipedia

Related:

List of Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross recipients

The Iron Cross & The Knight’s Cross

German Cross

Close Combat Clasp

Eastern Medal

German War Merit Cross (WWII Medal)

German Individual Combat Skills Awards World War 2 1939-1945

The Rarest German WWII Medal? 20th July 1944 Wound Badge

Bandit-Warfare Badge

German Waffen SS Cuff titles

Germany’s Secret U-Boats 1918 – 1935

U-Boat Aces about Das Boot

Wolfpack & U-Boat Tactics

The Second Happy Time – German U-boats Rampage Only Miles off the US Coast

The Manhattan U-Boat – German Submarine New York City

German Submarines Brought the Fight to Florida during WWII

Wreck of Rare Kriegsmarine B-boat Found near the Coasts of Denmark

The final resting place of three German U-boats, nicknamed “Hitler’s lost fleet”, has been found at the bottom of the Black Sea.

The U-boats That Time Forgot

The Shocking Truth of U234

The Mysterious Voyage of U-530

German U-Boats in Argentina 1945 – U-977

German U-Boat Action Pacific

The Laconia Incident

WWII U-Boats in the West German Navy

Elektroboot Submarines (1935 – 1955)

Submarine FACTS: Why Are Torpedoes Always The Same Size?

German miniature submarines – Normandy 1944

German Frogmen Attack – Nijmegen Bridge 1944

Ice Station Kurt – The Secret German Mission to Canada

Secret German Arctic Bases

MS Schwabenland

Karl Dönitz

Read about WWII here

U-boat War Badge

The U-boat War Badge (GermanU-Boot-Kriegsabzeichen) was a German war badge that was awarded to U-boat crew members during World War I and World War II.

History

The U-boat War Badge was originally instituted during the First World War on February 1, 1918. It was awarded to recognize U-boat crews who had completed three war patrols. The badge was worn on the lower left side of the uniform and was oval shaped resembling a wreath of laurel leaves. A submarine lay across the center and the German State Crown (Reichskrone) was inlaid at the top center of the wreath.

On October 13, 1939, the U-boat War Badge was reinstituted. It was very similar to the original badge with the exception of the imperial crown being replaced with a German Eagle above a swastika, and a more modernized submarine now facing towards the left was used. The new version was first made of bronze metal, with later ones made of zinc with a “gold wash”.


Classes

The award was bestowed in two classes:

U-Boat War Badge

There were several ways to be awarded this medal. The most common would be the completion of two or more war patrols. Although the completion of two war patrols might seem a lowly requirement, but a typical U-boat war cruise would often run into months at a time. Completing two war patrols could be equally dangerous as the U-boat has to endure constant attacks by Allied aircraft and warships. The other occasion when this badge was awarded was having been wounded during a patrol or killed in action.

U-boat War Badge with Diamonds

The U-boat War Badge with Diamonds was instituted by Großadmiral Karl Dönitz after he had received from Grand Admiral Erich Raeder a special solid gold version of the U-boat War Badge in which the wreath as well as the swastika were inlaid with diamonds.

The badge was a special issue award given to U-boat commanders who had received the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves. This version was made of gold plate over silver. Manufactured by the firms Schwerin u. Sohn and Gebr. Godet & Co. It was the same as the basic pattern but with nine small diamonds inlaid in the swastika. This award was more of a personal award by Dönitz. Approximately 30 were awarded, including the original one to Admiral Dönitz.

Recipients of the U-boat War badge with Diamonds

Source: Wikipedia

Related:

List of Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross recipients

The Iron Cross & The Knight’s Cross

German Cross

Close Combat Clasp

Eastern Medal

German War Merit Cross (WWII Medal)

German Individual Combat Skills Awards World War 2 1939-1945

The Rarest German WWII Medal? 20th July 1944 Wound Badge

Bandit-Warfare Badge

German Waffen SS Cuff titles

Germany’s Secret U-Boats 1918 – 1935

U-Boat Aces about Das Boot

Wolfpack & U-Boat Tactics

The Second Happy Time – German U-boats Rampage Only Miles off the US Coast

The Manhattan U-Boat – German Submarine New York City

German Submarines Brought the Fight to Florida during WWII

Wreck of Rare Kriegsmarine B-boat Found near the Coasts of Denmark

The final resting place of three German U-boats, nicknamed “Hitler’s lost fleet”, has been found at the bottom of the Black Sea.

The U-boats That Time Forgot

The Shocking Truth of U234

The Mysterious Voyage of U-530

German U-Boats in Argentina 1945 – U-977

German U-Boat Action Pacific

The Laconia Incident

WWII U-Boats in the West German Navy

Elektroboot Submarines (1935 – 1955)

Submarine FACTS: Why Are Torpedoes Always The Same Size?

German miniature submarines – Normandy 1944

German Frogmen Attack – Nijmegen Bridge 1944

Ice Station Kurt – The Secret German Mission to Canada

Secret German Arctic Bases

MS Schwabenland

Karl Dönitz

Read about WWII here

WW2 German Planes in Japanese Service

The story of how Japan bought and copied the famous German rocket fighter, the Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet, WW2’s fastest plane.

Mark Felton Productions

Japan

Secret Japanese Mission to German-Occupied France

Germany’s WW2 Japanese Legion

Japanese Awarded Knight’s Crosses

Japan’s German WWII U-Boats

Why the Japanese Navy and Army HATED Each other

How would have WW2 went if the US had not used nuclear bombs on Japan?

The Tokyo Trials – How America Sabotaged Justice in the Far East, 1945-58

What happened to Germany’s awesome aircraft manufacturers

Read about WWII here

Karl Dönitz

Karl Dönitz (sometimes spelled DoenitzGerman: [ˈdøːnɪts] (listen); 16 September 1891 – 24 December 1980) was a Germanadmiral who briefly succeeded Adolf Hitler as head of state in May 1945, holding the position until the dissolution of the Flensburg Government following Germany’s unconditional surrender to the Allies days later. As Supreme Commander of the Navy beginning in 1943, he played a major role in the naval history of World War II.

He began his career in the Imperial German Navy before World War I. In 1918, he was commanding UB-68, and was taken prisoner of war by British forces. While in a POW camp, he formulated what he later called Rudeltaktik (“pack tactic”, commonly called “wolfpack”).

By the start of the Second World War, Dönitz was supreme commander of the Kriegsmarine‘s U-boat arm (Befehlshaber der Unterseeboote (BdU)). In January 1943, Dönitz achieved the rank of Großadmiral (grand admiral) and replaced Grand Admiral Erich Raeder as Commander-in-Chief of the Navy. Dönitz was the main enemy of Allied naval forces in the Battle of the Atlantic. From 1939 to 1943 the U-boats fought effectively but lost the initiative from May 1943. Dönitz ordered his submarines into battle until 1945 to relieve the pressure on other branches of the Wehrmacht (armed forces). 648 U-boats were lost—429 with no survivors. Furthermore, of these, 215 were lost on their first patrol. Around 30,000 of the 40,000 men who served in U-boats perished.

Read more at Wikipedia

Karl Dönitz Speech to the German People – 1 May 1945

Flensburg Government

German WWII Ship Classes

German World War II commerce raiders

German Merchant Raiders of WW2 – Gentleman Raiders of the High Seas

The Real-Life German Pirates – WW2 Special

MV Wilhelm Gustloff

MV Goya

SS Cap Arcona

SS General von Steuben

SS Thielbek

Operation Hannibal

Tirpitz

Germany’s Secret U-Boats 1918 – 1935

U-Boat Aces about Das Boot

Wolfpack & U-Boat Tactics

The Second Happy Time – German U-boats Rampage Only Miles off the US Coast

The Manhattan U-Boat – German Submarine New York City

German Submarines Brought the Fight to Florida during WWII

Wreck of Rare Kriegsmarine B-boat Found near the Coasts of Denmark

The final resting place of three German U-boats, nicknamed “Hitler’s lost fleet”, has been found at the bottom of the Black Sea.

The U-boats That Time Forgot

The Shocking Truth of U234

The Mysterious Voyage of U-530

German U-Boats in Argentina 1945 – U-977

German U-Boat Action Pacific

The Laconia Incident

WWII U-Boats in the West German Navy

Elektroboot Submarines (1935 – 1955)

Submarine FACTS: Why Are Torpedoes Always The Same Size?

German miniature submarines – Normandy 1944

German Frogmen Attack – Nijmegen Bridge 1944

Ice Station Kurt – The Secret German Mission to Canada

Secret German Arctic Bases

MS Schwabenland

German Soldiers of World War II: Why They Were the Best, and Why They Still Lost

Read about WWII here

Karl Dönitz Speech to the German People – 1 May 1945

In his testament, Hitler made Grand Admiral Karl Dönitz, the Chief of the German Navy since 1943, his successor as President of the Reich. Dönitz announced this via Radio during a Broadcast from May 1st, 1945, which was broadcasted from Hamburg.

German WWII Archive

Karl Dönitz (sometimes spelled DoenitzGerman: [ˈdøːnɪts] (listen); 16 September 1891 – 24 December 1980) was a Germanadmiral who briefly succeeded Adolf Hitler as head of state in May 1945, holding the position until the dissolution of the Flensburg Government following Germany’s unconditional surrender to the Allies days later. As Supreme Commander of the Navy beginning in 1943, he played a major role in the naval history of World War II.

He began his career in the Imperial German Navy before World War I. In 1918, he was commanding UB-68, and was taken prisoner of war by British forces. While in a POW camp, he formulated what he later called Rudeltaktik (“pack tactic”, commonly called “wolfpack”).

By the start of the Second World War, Dönitz was supreme commander of the Kriegsmarine‘s U-boat arm (Befehlshaber der Unterseeboote (BdU)). In January 1943, Dönitz achieved the rank of Großadmiral (grand admiral) and replaced Grand Admiral Erich Raeder as Commander-in-Chief of the Navy. Dönitz was the main enemy of Allied naval forces in the Battle of the Atlantic. From 1939 to 1943 the U-boats fought effectively but lost the initiative from May 1943. Dönitz ordered his submarines into battle until 1945 to relieve the pressure on other branches of the Wehrmacht (armed forces). 648 U-boats were lost—429 with no survivors. Furthermore, of these, 215 were lost on their first patrol. Around 30,000 of the 40,000 men who served in U-boats perished.

Read more at Wikipedia

The Naval Academy Mürwik (GermanMarineschule Mürwik) is the main training establishment for all German Navy officers and in 1910 replaced the German Imperial Naval Academy in Kiel. ( which is now the seat of government or ”Landeshaus” of Schleswig-Holstein).

It is located at Mürwik which is a part of Germany’s northernmost city, Flensburg. Built on a small hill directly by the coast, it overlooks the Flensburg Fjord.

Read more at Wikipedia

Flensburg (German pronunciation: [ˈflɛnsbʊʁk] (listen); DanishLow SaxonFlensborgNorth FrisianFlansborjSouth JutlandicFlensborre) is an independent town (kreisfreie Stadt) in the north of the German state of Schleswig-Holstein. Flensburg is the centre of the region of Southern Schleswig. After Kiel and Lübeck, it is the third largest town in Schleswig-Holstein.

The nearest larger towns are Kiel (86 kilometres (53 miles) south) and Odense in Denmark (92 km (57 mi) northeast). Flensburg’s city centre lies about 7 km (4 mi) from the Danish border.

Flensburg is situated in the north of the German state Schleswig-Holstein, very close to the German-Danish border. After Westerland on the island of Sylt it is Germany’s northernmost town. Flensburg lies at the innermost tip of the Flensburg Firth, an inlet of the Baltic Sea. Flensburg’s eastern shore is part of the Anglia peninsula.

Clockwise from the northeast, beginning at the German shore of the Flensburg Firth, the following communities in Schleswig-Flensburg district and Denmark‘s Southern Denmark Region all border on Flensburg:

Glücksburg (Amt-free town), Wees (Amt Langballig), MaasbüllHürupTastrup and Freienwill (all in Amt Hürup), Jarplund-WedingHandewitt (Amt Handewitt), Harrislee (Amt-free community) and Aabenraa Municipality on the Danish shore of the Flensburg Firth.

Related image

Flensburg was founded at the latest by 1200 at the innermost end of the Flensburg Firth by Danish settlers, who were soon joined by German merchants. In 1284, its town rights were confirmed and the town quickly rose to become one of the most important in the Duchy of Schleswig. Unlike Holstein, however, Schleswig did not belong to the German Holy Roman Empire. Therefore, Flensburg was not a member of the Hanseatic League, but it did maintain contacts with this important trading network.

Between 1460 and 1864, Flensburg was, after Copenhagen, the second biggest port in the Kingdom of Denmark, but it passed to the Kingdom of Prussia after the Second Schleswig War in 1864.

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The Danish minority in Flensburg and the surrounding towns run their own schools, libraries and Lutheran churches from which the German majority is not excluded. The co-existence of these two groups is considered a sound and healthy symbiosis. There is a form of mixed Danish–German used on the ferries, Petuh.

There is also a Danish Consulate-General in Flensburg.

In Denmark, Flensburg seems to be mainly known for its “border shops” where, among other things, spiritsbeer and candy can be purchased at cheaper prices than in Denmark. The prices are lower because the value-added tax is lower and excise taxes are either lower (e.g. on alcohol) or do not exist (on e.g. sugar). Currently the border shops are able to sell canned beer to persons resident in Scandinavia without paying deposits as long as the beverage is not consumed in Germany.

Wikipedia

Flensburg Government

German WWII Ship Classes

German World War II commerce raiders

German Merchant Raiders of WW2 – Gentleman Raiders of the High Seas

The Real-Life German Pirates – WW2 Special

MV Wilhelm Gustloff

MV Goya

SS Cap Arcona

SS General von Steuben

SS Thielbek

Operation Hannibal

Tirpitz

Germany’s Secret U-Boats 1918 – 1935

U-Boat Aces about Das Boot

Wolfpack & U-Boat Tactics

The Second Happy Time – German U-boats Rampage Only Miles off the US Coast

The Manhattan U-Boat – German Submarine New York City

German Submarines Brought the Fight to Florida during WWII

Wreck of Rare Kriegsmarine B-boat Found near the Coasts of Denmark

The final resting place of three German U-boats, nicknamed “Hitler’s lost fleet”, has been found at the bottom of the Black Sea.

The U-boats That Time Forgot

The Shocking Truth of U234

The Mysterious Voyage of U-530

German U-Boats in Argentina 1945 – U-977

German U-Boat Action Pacific

The Laconia Incident

WWII U-Boats in the West German Navy

Elektroboot Submarines (1935 – 1955)

Submarine FACTS: Why Are Torpedoes Always The Same Size?

German miniature submarines – Normandy 1944

German Frogmen Attack – Nijmegen Bridge 1944

Ice Station Kurt – The Secret German Mission to Canada

Secret German Arctic Bases

MS Schwabenland

German Soldiers of World War II: Why They Were the Best, and Why They Still Lost

Read about WWII here

Last Wehrmacht Report – 9 May 1945

The Wehrmacht report was a daily report by the OKW, the German Army High Command, from the first day of WWII to the End.

It was generally a rather neutral report, that, unlike other german reports of that time, was not completly filled with Propaganda, although it did sometimes omitt losses or exaggerate own victories.

German WWII Archive