Mecklenburg State Theatre

The Mecklenburg State Theatre (GermanMecklenburgisches Staatstheater Schwerin) is the principal theatre of Schwerin in Germany. Its main theatre (or Grosses Haus) seats 650 people and is used for the performance of plays, opera, musical theatre and ballet.

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Designed by Georg Daniel, it was built between 1883 and 1886 after the previous theatre had been destroyed by fire in 1882. The theatre was inaugurated on 3 October 1886 with a performance of Gluck’s Iphigénie en Aulide with Marie Wittich in the title role. The complex also includes the State Museum in Schwerin (Staatliche Museum Schwerin) and a 240-seat concert hall, now used for performances of chamber works. All theatres were closed for the Autumn season of 1944, with the staff drafted wherever possible.

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By German WW2 standards wartime casualties and destruction by bombing in Schwerin were small, in spite of nightly RAF raids and the droning of massive bomber pulks as silver specks on the sky during the day on their way to Berlin. Americans were the first to enter the town in the spring of 1945, handing it over to the British until the Russians arrived. These ordered the immediate reopening of the theatre, taking great interest in light operas and operettas as an art they very much appreciated, but until then out of their reach in most parts of Stalin’s Soviet Union. Not familiar with Central European culture, one saw their well-fed ladies wearing night gowns during the invariably full houses as a substitute for an evening dress. In the immediate years to follow, there was a gradual exodus of key staff to the West, where few found equivalent employment. The ensuing vacancies provided new chances for many musicians, who were prepared to stay in East Germany to gain important positions there in their later career.

Wikipedia

Schloss Schwerin on the right (picture below).

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Burg Hohnstein

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Hohnstein Castle (GermanBurg Hohnstein) is a medieval castle in the village of the same name, Hohnstein in Saxon Switzerland in the Free State of Sachsen in East Germany.

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Location

The castle is located on a hard sandstone slab, 140 metres above the Polenz valley and is the major landmark of the small town.

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Hohnstein Castle was probably built around 1200 or earlier as a Bohemian border fortress for the Margravate of Meißen to defend it against Saxony. In 1353 the castle went into the possession of the Bohemian nobleman, Hynek Berka z Dubé, whose coat of arms with crossed oak branches decorates the entranceway to the second courtyard. In 1443 the Berkas of Dubá lost the estate through exchanges and purchase, only mentioned for the first time under their name, to the Electorate of Saxony under Frederick the Humble, although it remained a Bohemian fief until 1806. The Wettins used it as a base for hunting and for salmon spearing (Lachsstechen).

In the succeeding centuries the castle acted alternately as a seat of administration (electoral Amt), a court and a prison. The original wooden structures were gradually replaced during the 17th and 18th centuries by the present stone buildings and even successfully withstood a Swedish siege in 1639.

After the dissolution of the Amt in 1861 the castle served as a men’s correctional institute (Männerkorrektionsanstalt) and from 1919 as a juvenile prison.

In 1925 the mighty castle became a youth hostel (Jugendburg) and was one of the largest and most attractive youth hostels in Germany (with about 1,000 bedspaces). The Hohnsteiner Kasper puppet theatre is named after the town and castle and put on its first performance in 1928 in the castle. In the years 1933/34 a concentration camp was established here for so-called protective custody prisoners (Schutzhäftlinge), in practice 5,600 political prisoners. During World War II a prisoner of war camp was housed in the castle and, after the war it was a refuge for displaced persons. From 1949 it was extended to become the largest youth hostel in the GDR; at the end of the SED rule an internment camp for 890 political opponents was planned. In 1953 the National Science Museum for GeologyBotanyZoology and Ecology of the countryside was established here. In 1997 the castle was turned into a Friends of Nature house and youth guest house, to which the museum belongs today.

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Access to the castle is only possible from the market square (Marktplatz) in Hohnstein. Of the once numerous castles east of the Elbe in Saxon Switzerland, Hohnstein is the only one that has survived intact.

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Source: Wikipedia

Coat of arms of Free State of Saxony

Castles in Saxony

Schloss Moritzburg

Schloss Hartenfels

Schloss Colditz

Albrechtsburg

Festung Königstein

Jagdschloss Augustusburg

Burg Mildenstein

Burg Stein

Burg Kriebstein

Schloss Wolfsbrunn

Schloss Dresden

Schloss Albrechtsberg (Dresden)

Dresden Rathaus

Dresden – Frauenkirche

Bundeswehr Military History Museum

Leipzig Neues Rathaus

Monument to the Battle of the Nations in Leipzig, Germany

Bundeswehr Military History Museum

Militärhistorisches Museum der Bundeswehr October 2011.jpg

The Bundeswehr Military History Museum (GermanMilitärhistorisches Museum der Bundeswehr (MHMBw)) is the military museum of the German Armed Forces, the Bundeswehr, and one of the major military history museums in Germany. It is located in a former military arsenal in the Albertstadt which is part of Dresden. After a long history of switching titles and approaches to military history, the museum was re-opened in 2011 with a new internal and external concept. The museum focuses on the human aspects of war, while also showcasing the evolution of German military technology.

Museum as it appeared when it re-opened in 2011

Architecture

The original building, the armory, was built between 1873-1876 and became a museum in 1897. Originally the Saxon armory and museum, the building has served as a National Socialist museum, a Soviet museum and an East German museum which reflected the region’s shifting social and political positions over the last 135 years. In 1989, the museum was closed because the newly unified German state was unsure how the museum would fit into the history being created. By 2001, feelings regarding the museum had shifted and an architectural competition was held for an extension which would cause visitors to reconsider the way they think about war.

Before opening in October 2011 as the Bundeswehr Military History Museum, the building underwent six years of extensive construction. Using the design of architect Daniel Libeskind, the Neo-Classicist facade on the historic arsenal has been interrupted. Libeskind added a transparent arrowhead to the façade of the building, creating, according to the Dresden Tourism board, “an outwardly visible expression of innovation”. This new element is also reflected in the logo of the museum. Libeskind‘s studio states that “the openness and transparency of the new façade, representing the openness of democratic society, contrasts with the rigidity of the existing building, which represents the severity of the authoritarian past”. The silver arrowhead protrudes from the center of the traditional Neo-Classical building and provides a five story, 98 foot high viewing platform which overlooks the city. The platform provides views of modern Dresden while pointing towards the area where the fire bombings of Dresden began. The redesigned Dresden Museum of Military history has become the main museum of the German Armed Forces. The building itself is 14,000 square meters and has an inside and outside exhibition area of about 20,000 square meters, making it Germany’s largest museum. In every aspect, the museum is designed to alter the public’s perception of war.

Read more here at Wikipedia

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I feel that the ‘post-modern’ silver arrowhead symbolizes Cultural Marxism and Globalism as a parasite on Germanic culture and people.

+Militärhistorisches Museum der Bundeswehr in Dresden - Luftlande-Waffenträger Wiesel 1 - (MK20) 1991 - und - Panzerhaubitze 2000 - Bild 114.jpg

Leopard 2

Leopard 1 & 2

The Stealth Leopard

Raketenjagdpanzer

German PzH 2000 – 155mm Self-Propelled Howitzer

Flakpanzer Gepard Self Propelled Anti-Aircraft Gun

German Infantry Fighting Vehicle – Puma (IFV)

Boxer (armoured fighting vehicle)

Lynx (Rheinmetall armoured fighting vehicle)

The Wiesel Tankette – Overview

ATF Dingo

The Unimog. History of an unique vehicle concept

German Divisions (Bundeswehr)

I. German/Dutch Corps

Tanks of the Future

Rheinmetall

Thyssen Krupp

Army hierarchy

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Germany

Made in Germany

What happened to Germany’s awesome aircraft manufacturers

List of automobile manufacturers of Germany

Automotive companies of Germany

Automotive industry in Germany

Neoplan Jumbocruiser

Bundeswehr Military History Museum 6.jpg

Dresden 1945: The Devil’s Tinderbox

Dresden was a civilian town with no military significance. Why did they burn its people?

Bombing of Dresden in World War II

Anniversary of Dresden firebombing

Apocalypse at Dresden: The Long Suppressed Story of the Worst Massacre in History

“I Survived the Bombing of Dresden and Continue to Believe it was a War Crime”

Burning Hell: Bombing Holocaust of Hamburg by British Air Force (1943)

Allied Use of Delay-Action Bombs (aka Long-Term Chemical Detonator Bombs) and their Effects.

You Are Nothing-Your Nation Is Everything - Plate with Sign for Adolf Hitler Street - Military Museum - Dresden - Germany.jpg

Read about WWII here

Schloss Ralswiek

Ralswiek Castle

Ralswiek Castle is a manor house in Ralswiek on the island of Rügen. It is located on a hill above the Great Jasmunder Bodden.

The Großer Jasmunder Bodden belongs to the Northern Rügener Boddens and is a water body on the southern edge of the Baltic Sea in the German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. It is a bodden, a type of lagoon that occurs in northern Europe especially on the coast of Pomerania. It lies within the island of Rügen, is around 14 kilometres long, an average of six kilometres wide and is up to nine metres deep with an average depth of 5.3m. The Großer Jasmunder Bodden has an area of 58.6 square kilometres; if the Breetzer BoddenBreeger BoddenLebbiner BoddenNeuendorfer Wiek and Tetzitzer See are included the total area of water comes to over 94 square kilometres.

Read more about The Großer Jasmunder Bodden here

Ralswiek is a municipality in the Vorpommern-Rügen district, in Mecklenburg-VorpommernGermany.

Ralswiek is an old settlement place and was in the fiefdom of various Rügen noble families. The old manor house is located to the left of the castle. The originally single-storey building was demolished in the 19th century and rebuilt with two floors and a neo-Renaissance gable.

In 1891, the estate was sold to the manufacturer Hugo Sholto Graf Douglas from Aschersleben. From 1894 to 1896, the castle was built according to designs by the Berlin architect Gustav Stroh, and the neo-Renaissance architecture follows the models of French Renaissance castles. The rectangular building is flanked by two towers with cone roofs. The east side of the building faces the Bodden. The hood of the tower, which is located in front of the entrance, towers over the two outer towers. In the main building there is a covered courtyard. In 1913, the Marstall was built according to the design of the Stralsund builder Franz Juhre. The landscape park was built in 1810 and was extended around 1900.

The largely preserved interior decoration (entrance hall, stairwell, panelling, door handles, glass windows) was partly designed by the important Art Nouveau architect Henry van de Velde.

In 1939 the castle was expropriated, the Bodden became a war port, the Douglas Castle Casino. After the Second World War, the castle was used as a nursing home for the elderly and later as a nursing home for the disabled and nursing home of the German Red Cross. From 1999 to 2002, the castle was transformed into a hotel.

At the foot of the building there is a natural stage on the banks of the Great Jasmunder Bodden. This stage was created at the end of the 50’s for 7000 spectators. The Störtebeker Festival will be performed on it from the end of June to the beginning of September.

The extensive park surrounding the house is one of Rügen’s most interesting gardens due to its botanical diversity. It was built in 1810 and expanded and expanded by Count Douglas.

Wikipedia (German)

See more pictures here

Castles in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

Coat of arms of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania

Schloss Neustrelitz

Schloss Johannstorf

Schloss Bothmer

Schloss Schlemmin

Gutshaus Wietzow

Schloss Boitzenburg

Schloss Basedow

Jagdschloss Granitz

Herrenhaus Mallin

Schloss Schwerin

Schloss Ludwigslust

Stintenburginsel

Dömitz Fortress

Coat of arms of Free State of Bavaria

Castles in Bavaria

Coat of arms of North Rhine-Westphalia

Castles in North Rhine-Westphalia

Red with a white cross that extends to the edges of the flag; the vertical part of the cross is shifted to the hoist side

Castles in Schleswig-Holstein

Coat of arms of State of Hessen

Castles in Hesse

Burg Ronneburg

Schloss Birstein

Marburger Schloss

Schloss Eisenhammer

Schloss Bad Homburg

Schloss Philippsruhe

Schloss Arolsen

Burg Trendelburg

Burg Idstein

Schloss Heiligenberg (Jugenheim)

Schloss Steinheim

Jagdschloss Wabern

Schloss Fasanerie (Eichenzell)

Altes und Neues Schloss Büdesheim

Schloss Ramholz

Schloss Rauischholzhausen

Schloss Eisenbach

Schloss Biebrich

Stadtschloss Wiesbaden

Residenzschloss Darmstadt

Schlösschen Schönburg

Schloss Wolfsbrunnen

Burg Kronberg

Schloss Berlepsch

Schloss Wilhelmshöhe + Bergpark Wilhelmshöhe

Frankenberg, Hessen

Neues Rathaus Wiesbaden

Coat of arms of Saxony-Anhalt

Castles in Saxony-Anhalt:

Schloss Hundisburg (Hundisburg)

Schloss Blankenburg (Harz)

Schloss Neu-Augustusburg

Schloss Merseburger & Merseburger Dom

Schloss Stolberg in Sachsen-Anhalt

Burg Falkenstein (Harz)

Schloss Quedlinburg

Schloss Wernigerode

Neuenburg Castle (Freyburg)

Herrenhaus Brandenstein (Möckern)

Coat of arms of Lower Saxony

Castles in Lower Saxony

Schloss Bückeburg

Schloss Wolfenbüttel

Schloss Celle

Wolfsburg Castle

Schloss Dankern

Herrenhäuser Gärten, Hannover

Hannover Rathaus

Coat of arms of Free State of Saxony

Castles in Saxony

Schloss Moritzburg

Schloss Hartenfels

Schloss Colditz

Albrechtsburg

Festung Königstein

Jagdschloss Augustusburg

Burg Hohnstein

Burg Mildenstein

Burg Stein

Burg Kriebstein

Schloss Wolfsbrunn

Schloss Dresden

Schloss Albrechtsberg (Dresden)

Dresden Rathaus

Dresden – Frauenkirche

Bundeswehr Military History Museum

Leipzig Neues Rathaus

Monument to the Battle of the Nations in Leipzig, Germany

Coat of arms of Free State of Thuringia

Castles in Thuringia

Schloss Friedenstein

Coat of arms of Rhineland-Palatinate

Castles in Rhineland-Palatinate

Kurfürstliches Schloss in Koblenz

Coat of arms of Brandenburg

Castles in Brandenburg

Neues Palais (Potsdam) + Sanssouci Park

Flag of Germany

German 

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East German Castles and Mansions

Ost-Deutschland

Bellwitz

Berthelsdorf

Buchholz

Döbschütz

Drehsa

Ebersbach

Gebelzig

Gersdorf

Girbigsdorf

Girbigsdorf [?]

Glossen

Gosswitz

Gröditz

Gruna

Holtendorf

Holtendorf

Horka

Jänkendorf

Kieslingswalde

Kleinradmeritz

Klingewalde

Kollm

Königshain

Königswartha

Schloss Lanke

Schlosshauptgebäude mit der Aufschrift Gertrud-Seele-Haus, vor der Sanierung, Jahr 2008, Nordwestseite

Lanke Castle is a former property of the count’s family of Redern in the village of Lanke near the Hellsee. It was extended and redesigned in the middle of the 19th century as a two-storey plaster building in the style of the French Renaissance by the architect Eduard Knoblauch, based on a baroque country house. After the transfer to Berlin in 1914 and several conversions, it has been privately owned again since 2006. The new owner, with the support of the Brandenburg Heritage Protection Authority, had the building renovated for private residential purposes, holiday apartments and cultural use.

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During the 1930s and 1940s, Lanke Castle had an eventful history. In 1939, the Reichsarbeitsdienst [Reich Labour Service] was housed in the premises, from June 1945 a hospital and in the same year a Soviet command. In 1947, it was decided to transform it into a hospital. Lanke, who until then was under the control of the Berliner Stadtgüter GmbH as the Lanke estate administration, became the Volksgut Lanke in 1949. At the inauguration as a hospital on January 12, 1951, the institution received the honorary name after Gertrud Seele, the nurse and resistance fighter. After the closure of the hospital in 1966, the castle stood empty for two years, then became an outpost of the Eberswald district hospital with predominantly nursing tasks and was used until the 1990s.

Main entrance of the vacant castle in 2008; it still bears the lettering Gertrud-Seele-Haus
After the nursing home moved out at the end of the 1990s, the buildings stood empty for several years. In 2005 the Land of Berlin rented the Schlossensemble to the association Temporär e.V. for interim use, which organized cultural events here in the summer, but did not develop any activities for the preservation of the buildings or the park.

The castle was finally sold by the Land of Berlin and has been privately owned since 2006. It was renovated between 2011 and 2014. In addition to the living areas, a salon for cultural events and holiday apartments was created.

In the park against the backdrop of the castle, with the support of the new owners, individual events have already taken place, such as photo- and filming, or in the summer of 2009 a charity jazz concert, which raised funds for the restoration of the chapel of the Lanker cemetery. Further such events are planned.

Schloss Lanke served as the filming location for the film, Erledigung einer Sache in 2013.

The private commitment to the renovation of Lanke Castle ensures both the preservation of the listed complex and the contact with the residents of Lanker and their guests.

Wikipedia

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Castles in Brandenburg

Schloss Dammsmühle

Schloss Zehdenick

Schloss Boitzenburg

Schloss Dammsmühle

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Dammsmühle Castle is a neo-baroque manor house with a 28 hectare surrounding area in the district of Barnim of the state of Brandenburg. It is located on the territory of Schönwalde in the municipality of Wandlitz.

Nordostseite des Schlosses über den Mühlenteich

In the 16th century there was a mill on the site of the present-day Dammsmühle Castle, probably belonging to the Cistercian monastery of Lehnin, which had been in the possession of the lands of the area since the 14th and 15th centuries.

Around the year 1650 there was a hunting lodge on the site of the Cistercian mill on behalf of the Grand Elector Friedrich Wilhelm.

The site of the former mill was acquired in 1755 by the Berlin leather manufacturer Peter Friedrich Damm, who had the exclusive right to supply the Royal Prussian Army with uniform parts made of saber leather. He built the building of the Dammsmühle Castle in 1768 as a two-storey palace in a wooded area of the Barnim, west of the village of Schönwalde near Lake Mühlenbeck. Queen Elizabeth Christine, the wife of Frederick II, is said to have stayed there several times. In keeping with the fashion of the Rococo period, the castle had a theatre hall upstairs. After Damm’s death, the building fell into disrepair because there was no heir. At a forced auction in 1894, Lieutenant Adolf Wollank acquired the property and converted it into a manor house. He had the building rebuilt in neo-baroque style by the Berlin architects Gustav Erdmann and Ernst Spindler, upgraded, added with an extension and a tower with an onion hood added. On an artificial island in the mill pond, he had a building built in the form of a mosque, inside which was a large dance hall.

After the death of Adolf Wollank on 27 April 1915, his brother Otto Wollank managed the castle, which was now named Dammsmühle after his builder. Adolf Wollank was buried on the grounds of the castle in the Hubertus Pavilion opposite the castle, which he commissioned. The pavilion is no longer available.  The castle was sold in 1919 to the merchant Hermann Zirkel from (Berlin-) Zehlendorf.

Ten years later, in 1929, the British Harry Goodwin Hart, then director of Unilever, bought the property. After Hart and his Jewish wife had to leave Germany in 1938, it was expropriated in 1940. Now the castle came into the possession of Heinrich Himmler. From January to July 1943, 20 to 25 prisoners from Sachsenhausen concentration camp were employed for construction and maintenance.  Shortly before the end of the war, the commander of the Berlin-defending Wehrmacht army group “Weichsel”, Colonel General Gotthard Heinrici, opened his headquarters here.

After the end of the war in 1945, the castle was occupied by the Red Army. In 1959, the Ministry of State Security of the GDR took over the house and used it as a hunting lodge until 1989. During this time it was rebuilt, among other things in 1968 the existing Mansard roof was replaced by a full floor. After reunification, the castle briefly served as a hotel.

In 1997, the heirs of Harry Goodwin Hart were given back the property, who sold the property. The castle fell into disrepair due to years of vacancy.

In 2000, the area was used by a Berlin concert organizer (Messe & Eventbau Reissig headquarters Teltow-Fläming Brb aktuell) until October 2003 for open-air concerts of various genres, which attracted about 30,000 concert-goers annually and thus increased the awareness of the area. In 2003 the open-air music festival Nation of Gondwana took place there. The planned concept of developing Dammsmühle Castle into an event and recreation centre was ultimately not realised. The site was thus subjected to further decay, vandalism damage and illegal waste disposal.

In 2008, the property was transferred to Schlossgut Dammsmühle Management GmbH, which wanted to expand the site as a cultural experience world with free access for the public. This company entered into a long-term lease agreement with private man Gerd Matern the following year. Matern actually began a gradual transformation of the castle and the park. Since the early summer of 2009, numerous events have been organized on site, such as a Schloss-Biergarten brunch, a 3-lake run for everyone around the Mill Pond, a vintage car show with a rock concert, a haunted festival, etc. In addition, the revival of the bathing tradition, also in the rooms of the castle, was planned to set up a gourmet restaurant, a nightclub and a café in the former bowling alley. In the meantime, however, the operating company has ceased its activities.

Read more here at Wikipedia (in German)

Castle Dammsmühle in Schönwalde

Castles in Bavaria

Coat of arms of North Rhine-Westphalia

Castles in North Rhine-Westphalia

Red with a white cross that extends to the edges of the flag; the vertical part of the cross is shifted to the hoist side

Castles in Schleswig-Holstein

Coat of arms of State of Hessen

Castles in Hesse

Burg Ronneburg

Schloss Birstein

Marburger Schloss

Schloss Eisenhammer

Schloss Bad Homburg

Schloss Philippsruhe

Schloss Arolsen

Burg Trendelburg

Burg Idstein

Schloss Heiligenberg (Jugenheim)

Schloss Steinheim

Jagdschloss Wabern

Schloss Fasanerie (Eichenzell)

Altes und Neues Schloss Büdesheim

Schloss Ramholz

Schloss Rauischholzhausen

Schloss Eisenbach

Schloss Biebrich

Stadtschloss Wiesbaden

Residenzschloss Darmstadt

Schlösschen Schönburg

Schloss Wolfsbrunnen

Burg Kronberg

Schloss Berlepsch

Schloss Wilhelmshöhe + Bergpark Wilhelmshöhe

Frankenberg, Hessen

Neues Rathaus Wiesbaden

Coat of arms of Saxony-Anhalt

Castles in Saxony-Anhalt:

Schloss Hundisburg (Hundisburg)

Schloss Blankenburg (Harz)

Schloss Neu-Augustusburg

Schloss Merseburger & Merseburger Dom

Schloss Stolberg in Sachsen-Anhalt

Burg Falkenstein (Harz)

Schloss Quedlinburg

Schloss Wernigerode

Neuenburg Castle (Freyburg)

Herrenhaus Brandenstein (Möckern)

Flag of Germany

German 

Castles in Brandenburg

Schloss Zehdenick

Schloss Boitzenburg

AfD outperforms polls in Saxony and Brandenburg!

Hitler’s Elite Special Forces | The Brandenburgers

Gotthard Heinrici.jpg

Gotthard Fedor August Heinrici (25 December 1886 – 10 December 1971) was a German general during World War II. Heinrici is considered as the premier defensive expert of the Wehrmacht. He was the commander-in-chief of the Army Group Vistula, formed from the remnants of Army Group A and Army Group Center to defend Berlin from the Soviet armies advancing from the Vistula River.

Read more here at Wikipedia

Read about WWII here

Germany

Schloss Bellevue

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Bellevue Palace (GermanSchloss Bellevue), located in Berlin‘s Tiergarten district, has been the official residence of the President of Germany since 1994. The schloss is situated on the banks of the Spree river, near the Berlin Victory Column, along the northern edge of the Großer Tiergarten park. Its name – the French for “beautiful view” – derives from its scenic prospect over the Spree’s course.

The presidential standard is flown at Bellevue.

Designed by architect Michael Philipp Boumann, Schloss Bellevue was erected in 1786 as a summer residence for Prince Augustus Ferdinand of PrussiaHerrenmeister (“Master of the Knights”) of the Johanniterorden (“Order of Saint John”) and younger brother of King Frederick II of Prussia, on the site of a manor house which Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff had built in 1743. Bellevue was the first Neoclassical building in Germany, characterized by its Corinthian pilasters, with wings on either side (“Ladies’ wing” and “[River] Spree wing”). The upper floor holds a ballroom designed by Carl Gotthard Langhans. The Palace is surrounded by a park of about 20 hectares.

In 1843, King Frederick William IV of Prussia acquired Bellevue, which, in 1865, became the residence of his niece Princess Alexandrine after her marriage to Duke William of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. It served the royal and imperial princes of the Hohenzollern dynasty until the German Revolution of 1918–19.

A property of the Free State of Prussia from 1928, the Palace was used as a museum of ethnography during the 1930s before being renovated as a guest house for the NSDAP government in 1938. It was there that Soviet foreign minister Vyacheslav Molotov stayed with his retinue during his visit to Berlin in November 1940. During World War II, the Palace was severely damaged by strategic bombing and in the 1945 Battle of Berlin, before being substantially refurbished in the 1950s. Inaugurated by President Theodor Heuss in 1959, it served as the secondary residence of the West German president, a pied à terre in West Berlin to supplement his primary residence at the Hammerschmidt Villa in Bonn. It was refurbished again in 1986–87, and, in 1994, after German reunification, President Richard von Weizsäcker made it his primary residence. A modern annex to the southern wing was built in 1998 to house the offices of the affiliated Bundespräsidialamt (“Office of the Federal President”), a federal agency.

Roman Herzog, president from 1994 to 1999, remains the only officeholder who lived at Bellevue while incumbent. The Palace was reconstructed again in 2004 and 2005 to remedy defects in earlier renovations; during this period, President Horst Köhler used nearby Charlottenburg Palace for representative purposes. Bellevue became the president’s primary official seat again in January 2006, but since then has not included living quarters. Instead, the Federal President now lives in a government-owned villa in Dahlem, a suburban district of southwestern Berlin.

See more pictures here

In 1945, according to testimony reported in the 1995 documentary film On the Desperate Edge of Now, Berlin citizens buried statues of historical military figures from the Großer Tiergarten in the grounds of the Palace to prevent their destruction. They were not recovered until 1993.

Wikipedia

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Bellevue Palace 1978

Reichstag

Reich Chancellery

Berliner Stadtschloss

Berliner Rathaus + Rathaus Schöneberg

Rathaus Spandau (Berlin)

Berlin Museumsinsel

Brunnenplatz (Berlin)

Gendarmenmarkt Square in Berlin

Berlin, Schoeneberg, Nollendorfplatz, U-Bahnhof

Charlottenburg Palace, Berlin

Jagdschloss Glienicke, Berlin

Steglitz, Berlin

Berlin 1937

Berlin 1935

Prinz-Albrecht-Palais

Potsdamer Stadtschloss

Spandau Citadel

Berlin Tiergarten-Zoo G-Turm

Flaktürme

Flak Towers

Germany WWII

Read about WWII here

German Castles

Goebbels Homes

I enjoyed making “WWII – Where did the Germans live? in Denmark”.

As I was blogging about German castles I noticed an old post about Schloss Rheydt, former residence of Dr. Joseph Paul Goebbels. 

And thought about where else he lived.

Villa Goebbels, Behrenstraße, Berlin

Source: Dines Bogø

Goebbel’s Berlin villa behind the wall to right (largely obscured by trees). The construction on Herman Goering Strasse (todays Ebertstrasse) is for a new S-Bahn line (c.1933–35). The large building left of center was the old pre-war U.S. embassy (Blucher Palace) and also the site of today’s embassy. The Brandenburg Gate is visible at far left.

Source: Quora

History weighs heavily on the German property market, no more so than at a sprawling lakeside villa that once served as a love nest for Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels.

Bogensee is a small lake near Wandlitz in the German state of Brandenburg, located about 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) north of the Berlin city limits.

Bogensee is known for the nearby former summer retreat of NS minister Joseph Goebbels, located approximately 500 m (1,600 ft) northwest of the shore. The premises were dedicated to Goebbels by the Berlin city administration on the occasion of his 39th birthday in 1936; he had an extended country home erected at the site until 1939, including a private cinema, a bunker, and adjacent SS barracks. Co-financed by the UFA film company, the building became a popular venue for movie actors like Zarah LeanderEmil Jannings, or Heinz Rühmann.

Temporarily seized by the Soviet Military Administration after World War II, the former country house was included into the newly established academy of the East German Free German Youth (FDJ) association. A wide building complex was erected from 1951 onwards, according to plans designed by Hermann Henselmann in a Stalinist style. Since German reunification in 1990, most of the buildings have been empty. As of 2018, the property had remained unoccupied for two decades. 

Wikipedia

Berlin authorities are unsure what to do with the rumoured love pad after attempts to sell it have proved unsuccessful while some experts argue that it should be demolished.

Daily Mail

Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels' love nest goes on market ...

Known as the ‘Haus am Bogensee’, the lakeside residence has 70 rooms.

Billedresultat for Herrenhaus von Schloss Rheydt

Schloss Rheydt, former residence of Dr. Joseph Paul Goebbels.

Schloss Rheydt is a Renaissance palace in RheydtMönchengladbachNorth Rhine-WestphaliaGermany. Over the years the building has been the family seat of various noble families, including the Bylandt-Rheydt dynasty that ruled over Rheydt for over 300 years and gave the palace its present look

Wikipedia

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“Then we stand in front of Odenkirchener Straße 202, the birthplace of Joseph Goebbels – which for a long time was not in the public eye until Gregor Schneider bought it, gutted it and removed the traces of his past.”

Source: Spitzen Rheydterin

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“The city archives had asked me to photograph the two Goebbels houses – the real occasion of the walk and a nice excuse to do just that. Joseph Goebbels lived in his youth at 156 Dahlener Straße (formerly 140) and there he later visited his mother, cheered by many people on the side of the road.”

Source: Spitzen Rheydterin

Bundesarchiv Bild 146-1968-101-20A, Joseph Goebbels.jpg

Paul Joseph Goebbels was born on 29 October 1897 in Rheydt, an industrial town south of Mönchengladbach near Düsseldorf. Both of his parents were Roman Catholics with modest family backgrounds. His father Fritz was a German factory clerk; his mother Katharina (née Odenhausen) was born to Dutch and German parents in the Netherlands.Goebbels had five siblings: Konrad (1893–1947), Hans (1895–1949), Maria (1896–1896), Elisabeth (1901–1915), and Maria (1910–1949), who married the German filmmaker Max W. Kimmich in 1938. In 1932, Goebbels published a pamphlet of his family tree to refute the rumours that his grandmother was of Jewish ancestry.

Wikipedia

Herrenhaus von Schloss Rheydt

Rathaus Rheydt & Schloss Rheydt

Castles in North Rhine-Westphalia

German Castles

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