The Royal Library

The building of the Royal Library, Denmark, on Slotsholmen, which dates to 1906, viewed from the northwest (in Copenhagen)

The Royal Library (DanishDet Kongelige Bibliotek) in Copenhagen is the national library of Denmark and the university library of the University of Copenhagen. It is among the largest libraries in the world and the largest in the Nordic countries. In 2017, it merged with the State and University Library in Aarhus to form a combined national library. The combined library organisation (the separate library locations in Copenhagen and Aarhus are maintained) is known as the Royal Danish Library (DanishDet Kgl. Bibliotek).

It contains numerous historical treasures, and a copy of all works printed in Denmark since the 17th century are deposited there. Thanks to extensive donations in the past, the library holds nearly all known Danish printed works back to and including the first Danish books, printed in 1482 by Johann Snell.

The Royal Library in Fiolstræde (Copenhagen).

History

The library was founded in 1648 by King Frederik III, who contributed a comprehensive collection of European works. It was opened to the public in 1793.

In 1989, it was merged with the prestigious Copenhagen University Library (founded in 1482) (UB1). In 2005, it was merged with the Danish National Library for Science and Medicine (UB2), now the Faculty Library of Natural and Health Sciences. The official name of the organization as of 1 January 2006 is The Royal Library, the National Library of Denmark and the Copenhagen University Library. In 2008, the Danish Folklore Archive was merged with the Royal Library.

The University Library on Nørre Allé (photo taken from Tagensvej in Copenhagen)

Items collected

Books, journals, newspapers, pamphlets and corporate publications, manuscripts and archives, maps, prints and photographs, music scores, documentation of folkways and popular traditions, four annual electronic copies of the Danish Internet by legal deposit.

As of 2017, there Royal Library had 36,975,069 physical units and 2,438,978 electronic titles. The online catalogue, in combination with the reading room, is still our patron’s most direct form of access to our collections.

The Black Diamond building, viewed from the east.

The walkway between the new and old library.

Today, The Royal Library has five sites: The main library at Slotsholmen, Copenhagen harbour (in the Black Diamond), covering all subjects and special collections; one at Nørre Alle, Faculty Library of Natural and Health Sciences; one at Gothersgade, central Copenhagen, Faculty Library of Social Sciences; one at Amager, Faculty Library of Humanities; and, one in Studiestræde, central Copenhagen, The Faculty of Law Library. The annual circulation is 11,400,000 loans (10,900,000 of these are electronic loans). The members are 32,196 active users. The annual budget: 394M Danish Kroner (58M US Dollars), including building expenses and maintenance.

The library is open to anyone above the age of 18 with a genuine need to use the collections. Special rules apply for use of rare and valuable items.

Statue of Peder Schumacher Griffenfeld in the Garden of the Royal Library.

The Garden of the Royal Library can be seen in the lower left next to Christiansborg, the seat of the Danish Parliament (Folketinget).

The old building of the Slotsholmen site was built in 1906 by Hans Jørgen Holm. The central hall is a copy of Charlemagne‘s Palace chapel in the Aachen Cathedral. The building is still being used by the library.

In 1999, a new building adjacent to the old one was opened at Slotsholmen, known as the Black Diamond. The Black Diamond building was designed by Danish architects schmidt hammer lassen. Named for its outside cover of black marble and glass, the Black Diamond building houses a concert hall in addition to the library.

The Black Diamond is formed by two black cubes that are slightly tilted over the street. In between, there is an eight-storey atrium whose walls are white and wave-shaped, with a couple of transversal corridors that link both sides, and balconies on every floor. The atrium’s exterior wall is made of glass; so, you can see the sea; and, on the opposite shore, you can see Christianshavn’s luxury buildings.

Three bridges connect the Black Diamond with the old part of the Royal Library; those three bridges (two small ones for internal transport and a big one with the circulation desk) go over the road. At the ceiling of the big bridge, there is a huge painting by Danish painter Per Kirkeby.

The Book Tower in Aarhus, is a significant corner at Aarhus University.

The Royal Library acquires Danish books through legal deposit. The holdings include an almost complete collection of all Danish printed books back from 1482. In 2006, legal deposit was extended to electronic publications and now the library harvests four electronic copies of the Danish Internet each year. Danish books printed before 1900 are digitized on demand and made freely available to the public. As the National library, RDL has vast collections of digital material (Danish net archive, digitized radio and TV and newspapers etc.) which are relevant for scholars in many fields. The library also holds a large and significant collection of old foreign scholarly and scientific literature, including precious books of high value and of importance for book history, including a rare copy of the Gutenberg Bible.

The library holds treasures which are inscribed on UNESCO‘s Memory of the World Register: A collection of about 2,000 books by and about Carl Linné (1997); the manuscripts and correspondence of Hans Christian Andersen (1997); the Søren Kierkegaard Archives (manuscripts and personal papers) (1997); Guamán Poma de Ayala‘s El Primer Nueva Coronica y Buen Gobierno, an autographed manuscript of 1,200 pages including 400 full-page drawings depicting the indigenous point of view on pre-conquest Andean life and Inca rule, the Spanish conquest in 1532, early Spanish colonial rule, and the systematic abuse of the rights of the indigenous population (2007). Biblia Latina. Commonly called the Hamburg Bible or the Bible of Bertoldus (MS. GKS 4 2°), a richly illuminated Bible in three very large volumes made for the Cathedral of Hamburg in 1255. The 89 illuminated initials in the book are unique both as expressions of medieval art and as sources to the craft and history of the medieval book. (2011);

Other treasures are the Copenhagen Psalter, the Dalby Gospel Book, the Angers fragment (parts of Denmark’s first national chronicle), and maps of the Polar Region. The library also holds important collections of Icelandic manuscripts, primarily in Den gamle kongelige samling (The Old Royal Collection) and Den nye kongelige samling (The New Royal Collection). Denmark’s most outstanding Icelandic collection, the Arnamagnæan Manuscript Collection, is however not a holding of The Royal Library but of the University of Copenhagen.

Pictures from Wikipedia Commons

Between 1968 and 1978, the library saw one of the largest book thefts in Denmark’s history. 3,200 books and document worth up to $50 million USD were stolen by an employee from the library. The theft remained undetected until 1975. Between 1998 and 2002, the thief succeeded in selling books worth about $2 million at various auctions. The case was finally solved in September 2003, after a stolen book had surfaced at Christie’s auction house in London. The thief, a director of the library’s oriental department named Frede Møller-Kristensen, had died in January 2003. His family then became careless in selling the remaining books. At a coordinated raid of the family’s homes in Germany and Denmark in November 2003, some 1,500 books were recovered. In June 2004, his wife, son, daughter-in-law and a family friend were sentenced to prison terms ranging from 18 months to three years; Eva Moeller-Kristensen, the 69-year-old widow, was sentenced in Copenhagen’s City Court to three years in prison, Thomas Moller-Kristensen, his 42-year-old son, got two years; Silke Albrecht, his 33-year-old daughter-in-law, and Patrick Adam Peters, a friend, each received 18 months; the friend was acquitted on appeal. In April 2005, a daughter of the thief was also found guilty. The library maintains a list of missing books.

Wikipedia

Royal Library Garden, Copenhagen (Wikipedia)

Denmark

Danish Castles

Fortifications of Copenhagen

Kastellet and the Fortification Ring, Copenhagen, Denmark

Københavns Toldbod – Copenhagen Custom Tax Buildings

Københavns Frihavn – Copenhagen Freeport

The Little Mermaid

Rosenborg Castle

Christiansborg Slot – Christiansborg Castle

Christiansborg Bunker

Amalienborg Palace

Copenhagen City Hall

City Hall Square, Copenhagen

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Charlottenborg Palace

Moltke’s Mansion

The Lur Blowers Monument

Dragon Fountain, Copenhagen

House of Architectural Heritage

Copenhagen 1960s

Copenhagen, Denmark

Winter in Denmark

Tuborgflasken

King of the hill: Elephants, elegance and 170 years of Carlsberg

Thor in battle with the ‘giants’

Christianshavn, København, Danmark

Holmen

Søtorvet

Retired crane becomes luxury-retreat

The Olsen Gang’s Big Score, The Dragon House & The Gefion Fountain

University of Copenhagen Botanical Garden

Parks and open spaces in Copenhagen

Christiansborg

Kronborg – Helsingør

Rosenborg Castle

Amalienborg Palace

Frederiksborg Castle

Fredensborg Palace

Charlottenlund Palace

Bernstorff Palace and Palace Gardens

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Bregentved

Augustenborg Palace

Lerchenborg Slot

Gavnø Slot

Ledreborg

Aalholm Slot

Holckenhavn

Holsteinborg

Vallø Slot

Hvedholm Slot

Tranekær Slot

Rosenholm Slot

Koldinghus

Gråsten Palace

Borreby Castle

Rosenfeldt Manor

Basnæs

Gram Slot

Berritzgaard

Krenkerup Gods

Lykkesholm Slot

Næsseslottet

Skjoldenæsholm Slot

Gurrehus

Herlufsholm

Sophienholm

Gyldensteen

Hørbygård

Rosengaard

Egholm

Arresødal

Christiansgave

Fredsholm

Lindholm

Krabbesholm (Gershøj Sogn)

Skanderborg Slot

Charlottenborg Palace

Varna Palæet

Moltke’s Mansion

Thott Mansion

Copenhagen City Hall

Valdemar’s Castle, Egeskov and Svendborg

Kronborg Castle and Helsingør Shipyard

Sønderborg Castle and Sønderborg Shipyard

Korsør Shipyard and Fortress

Hotel Koldingfjord

Værløse Air Base

More to come.

Ferdinand Vilhelm Jensen

Ferdinand Meldahl

Heinrich Wenck

Vilhelm Dahlerup

Martin Nyrop

Hack Kampmann

Emil Blichfeldt

Hermann Baagøe Storck

Ulrik Plesner

Aage Langeland-Mathiesen

Martin Borch

Johan Daniel Herholdt

Anton Rosen

Johan Schrøder

Vilhelm Fischer

Gurrehus

Gurrehus is a country house, later proprietary farm and castle in Gurre, North Zealand by the ruin of Gurre Castle.

During World War II, the Wehrmacht was based at Gurrehus and after the war the Danish Red Cross.

In 1966, Gurrehus underwent a significant change when the Armed Forces added a room wing to the main building. The room wing contained rooms for the accommodation of students and cadets. In connection with the construction of the room wing, a structurally reinforced security basement was established. After this, the Ministry of Defense used Gurrehus as a course property and reserve officer school.

In 1998, the Danish Defence Building Service decided to sell Gurrehus.

Wikipedia

Gurrehus Castle is located next to Gurre Lake and with Elsinore as the nearest major town. According to Boliga.dk’s information, the building contains 2,590 residential sqm spread over 30 rooms, and in addition there is more than 1,000 sqm of basement.

Gurrehus Castle is located on a 43,000 sqm plot.

Byens Ejendom

According to legend, the Danish king Valdemar Atterdag died in 1375 precisely at Gurre Castle.

TV2 Lorry

Billedresultat for denmark and germany

WWII – Where did the Germans live?

Related image

Denmark

Danish Castles

Fortifications of Copenhagen

Kastellet and the Fortification Ring, Copenhagen, Denmark

Københavns Toldbod – Copenhagen Custom Tax Buildings

Københavns Frihavn – Copenhagen Freeport

The Little Mermaid

Rosenborg Castle

Christiansborg Slot – Christiansborg Castle

Christiansborg Bunker

Amalienborg Palace

Copenhagen City Hall

City Hall Square, Copenhagen

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Charlottenborg Palace

Moltke’s Mansion

The Lur Blowers Monument

Dragon Fountain, Copenhagen

House of Architectural Heritage

Copenhagen 1960s

Copenhagen, Denmark

Winter in Denmark

Tuborgflasken

King of the hill: Elephants, elegance and 170 years of Carlsberg

Thor in battle with the ‘giants’

Christianshavn, København, Danmark

Holmen

Søtorvet

Retired crane becomes luxury-retreat

The Olsen Gang’s Big Score, The Dragon House & The Gefion Fountain

University of Copenhagen Botanical Garden

Parks and open spaces in Copenhagen

Christiansborg

Kronborg – Helsingør

Rosenborg Castle

Amalienborg Palace

Frederiksborg Castle

Fredensborg Palace

Charlottenlund Palace

Bernstorff Palace and Palace Gardens

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Bregentved

Augustenborg Palace

Lerchenborg Slot

Gavnø Slot

Ledreborg

Aalholm Slot

Holckenhavn

Holsteinborg

Vallø Slot

Hvedholm Slot

Tranekær Slot

Rosenholm Slot

Koldinghus

Gråsten Palace

Borreby Castle

Rosenfeldt Manor

Basnæs

Gram Slot

Berritzgaard

Krenkerup Gods

Lykkesholm Slot

Næsseslottet

Skjoldenæsholm Slot

Herlufsholm

Sophienholm

Gyldensteen

Hørbygård

Rosengaard

Egholm

Arresødal

Christiansgave

Fredsholm

Lindholm

Krabbesholm (Gershøj Sogn)

Skanderborg Slot

Charlottenborg Palace

Varna Palæet

Moltke’s Mansion

Thott Mansion

Copenhagen City Hall

Valdemar’s Castle, Egeskov and Svendborg

Kronborg Castle and Helsingør Shipyard

Sønderborg Castle and Sønderborg Shipyard

Korsør Shipyard and Fortress

Hotel Koldingfjord

Værløse Air Base

More to come.

Ferdinand Vilhelm Jensen

Ferdinand Meldahl

Heinrich Wenck

Vilhelm Dahlerup

Martin Nyrop

Hack Kampmann

Emil Blichfeldt

Hermann Baagøe Storck

Ulrik Plesner

Aage Langeland-Mathiesen

Martin Borch

Johan Daniel Herholdt

Anton Rosen

Johan Schrøder

Vilhelm Fischer

Related image

Denmark is Building a Tunnel to Germany

The Fehmarntunnel becomes a heavyweight

Denmark Is Building World’s First Artificial Island Full of Giant Wind Turbines

WIND FARM ASSEMBLY Off The Coast Of Sylt – Millimeter Work In All Weathers

Højgaard & Schultz

Christiansgave

Christiansgave was built in 1918 as a country house for wholesaler C. W. Messerschmidt. The architect was Carl Brummer, who together with the developer chose a Baroque-inspired building style. Park and garden were designed by the garden architect Erstad-Jørgensen.

Photo: Christiansgaves main building on the east side of Strandvejen in Rungsted, seen from the air in 1937.

Hørsholm Nyheder

According to Boligsiden the building has 903 m² 

Hørsholm (Danish pronunciation: [ˈhɶɐ̯sˌhʌlˀm]) is an urban area on the Øresund coast approximately 25 km (15.53 mi) north of Copenhagen, Denmark. It covers most of Hørsholm Municipality and straddles the borders neighbouring Fredensborg Municipality and Rudersdal Municipality.

Hørsholm proper is developed around Hirschholm Palace, which was constructed in the 1730s, but the town has later absorbed several of the nearby communities that are of much older origins.

Read more at Wikipedia

Rungsted, also known as Rungsted Kyst is an affluent suburban neighborhood in Hørsholm Municipality on the Øresund coast north of CopenhagenDenmark. The center of Hørsholm is located two kilometers west of Rungsted. At the Øresund coast is Rungsted Harbour, a marina.

Wikipedia

Related image

Rungsted in Hørsholm and Vedbæk (close to Hørsholm) are some of the most expensive and exclusively areas to buy house in Denmark.

Denmark

Danish Castles

Fortifications of Copenhagen

Kastellet and the Fortification Ring, Copenhagen, Denmark

Københavns Toldbod – Copenhagen Custom Tax Buildings

Københavns Frihavn – Copenhagen Freeport

The Little Mermaid

Rosenborg Castle

Christiansborg Slot – Christiansborg Castle

Christiansborg Bunker

Amalienborg Palace

Copenhagen City Hall

City Hall Square, Copenhagen

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Charlottenborg Palace

Moltke’s Mansion

The Lur Blowers Monument

Dragon Fountain, Copenhagen

House of Architectural Heritage

Copenhagen 1960s

Copenhagen, Denmark

Winter in Denmark

Tuborgflasken

King of the hill: Elephants, elegance and 170 years of Carlsberg

Thor in battle with the ‘giants’

Christianshavn, København, Danmark

Holmen

Søtorvet

Retired crane becomes luxury-retreat

The Olsen Gang’s Big Score, The Dragon House & The Gefion Fountain

University of Copenhagen Botanical Garden

Parks and open spaces in Copenhagen

Christiansborg

Kronborg – Helsingør

Rosenborg Castle

Amalienborg Palace

Frederiksborg Castle

Fredensborg Palace

Charlottenlund Palace

Bernstorff Palace and Palace Gardens

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Bregentved

Augustenborg Palace

Lerchenborg Slot

Gavnø Slot

Ledreborg

Aalholm Slot

Holckenhavn

Holsteinborg

Vallø Slot

Hvedholm Slot

Tranekær Slot

Rosenholm Slot

Koldinghus

Gråsten Palace

Borreby Castle

Rosenfeldt Manor

Basnæs

Gram Slot

Berritzgaard

Krenkerup Gods

Lykkesholm Slot

Næsseslottet

Skjoldenæsholm Slot

Herlufsholm

Sophienholm

Gyldensteen

Hørbygård

Rosengaard

Egholm

Arresødal

Fredsholm

Lindholm

Krabbesholm (Gershøj Sogn)

Skanderborg Slot

Charlottenborg Palace

Varna Palæet

Moltke’s Mansion

Thott Mansion

Copenhagen City Hall

Valdemar’s Castle, Egeskov and Svendborg

Kronborg Castle and Helsingør Shipyard

Sønderborg Castle and Sønderborg Shipyard

Korsør Shipyard and Fortress

Hotel Koldingfjord

Værløse Air Base

More to come.

Ferdinand Vilhelm Jensen

Ferdinand Meldahl

Heinrich Wenck

Vilhelm Dahlerup

Martin Nyrop

Hack Kampmann

Emil Blichfeldt

Hermann Baagøe Storck

Ulrik Plesner

Aage Langeland-Mathiesen

Martin Borch

Johan Daniel Herholdt

Anton Rosen

Johan Schrøder

Vilhelm Fischer

Krabbesholm (Gershøj Sogn)

The manor was established in 1673 by Baron Oluf Rosenkrantz, who also held the neighbouring town of Egholm. Rosenkrantz was given royal permission to create a manor house of the land from the devastated village of Vinderup. Whether this village was deserted in the Swedish wars cannot be determined in the sources.

Krabbesholm Estate is on 484 hectares with Lindegård.

Wikipedia

Denmark

Danish Castles

Fortifications of Copenhagen

Kastellet and the Fortification Ring, Copenhagen, Denmark

Københavns Toldbod – Copenhagen Custom Tax Buildings

Københavns Frihavn – Copenhagen Freeport

The Little Mermaid

Rosenborg Castle

Christiansborg Slot – Christiansborg Castle

Christiansborg Bunker

Amalienborg Palace

Copenhagen City Hall

City Hall Square, Copenhagen

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Charlottenborg Palace

Moltke’s Mansion

The Lur Blowers Monument

Dragon Fountain, Copenhagen

House of Architectural Heritage

Copenhagen 1960s

Copenhagen, Denmark

Winter in Denmark

Tuborgflasken

King of the hill: Elephants, elegance and 170 years of Carlsberg

Thor in battle with the ‘giants’

Christianshavn, København, Danmark

Holmen

Søtorvet

Retired crane becomes luxury-retreat

The Olsen Gang’s Big Score, The Dragon House & The Gefion Fountain

University of Copenhagen Botanical Garden

Parks and open spaces in Copenhagen

Christiansborg

Kronborg – Helsingør

Rosenborg Castle

Amalienborg Palace

Frederiksborg Castle

Fredensborg Palace

Charlottenlund Palace

Bernstorff Palace and Palace Gardens

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Bregentved

Augustenborg Palace

Lerchenborg Slot

Gavnø Slot

Ledreborg

Aalholm Slot

Holckenhavn

Holsteinborg

Vallø Slot

Hvedholm Slot

Tranekær Slot

Rosenholm Slot

Koldinghus

Gråsten Palace

Borreby Castle

Rosenfeldt Manor

Basnæs

Gram Slot

Berritzgaard

Krenkerup Gods

Lykkesholm Slot

Næsseslottet

Skjoldenæsholm Slot

Herlufsholm

Sophienholm

Gyldensteen

Hørbygård

Rosengaard

Egholm

Arresødal

Fredsholm

Lindholm

Skanderborg Slot

Charlottenborg Palace

Varna Palæet

Moltke’s Mansion

Copenhagen City Hall

Valdemar’s Castle, Egeskov and Svendborg

Kronborg Castle and Helsingør Shipyard

Sønderborg Castle and Sønderborg Shipyard

Korsør Shipyard and Fortress

Hotel Koldingfjord

Værløse Air Base

More to come.

Ferdinand Vilhelm Jensen

Ferdinand Meldahl

Heinrich Wenck

Vilhelm Dahlerup

Martin Nyrop

Hack Kampmann

Emil Blichfeldt

Hermann Baagøe Storck

Ulrik Plesner

Aage Langeland-Mathiesen

Martin Borch

Johan Daniel Herholdt

Anton Rosen

Johan Schrøder

Næsseslottet

Næsseslottet on Lake Fure was built in 1783 by the merchant Frédéric de Coninck. Who he used as an architect is unknown, but the building is attributed to both Joseph Guione and Andreas Kirkerup.

The louis seize-style building was built in the middle of a park with 8 straight viewing lines that had been built 100 years earlier. The area extends east to Kongevejen and Rudersdal.

De Coninck was from Flanders and hired a landscape architect, Henri Devon – also from Flanders – to conduct the work on the park. He got great inspiration from the South English manor park, and it became Denmark’s first romantic garden. It was planted with exotic trees, many of which still exist, and meandering paths and glorious vantage points were built over Lake Fure.

The Red Cross used The Næsseslottet as the first asylum centre for refugees in 1984.

In recent times, the park around the castle was renovated by the Danish Forest and Nature Agency in collaboration with Søllerød Municipality and with support from various foundations.

The castle itself has been converted into a private office hotel.

The address is now Dronninggårds Allé 136, Holte.

Wikipedia

Denmark

Danish Castles

Fortifications of Copenhagen

Kastellet and the Fortification Ring, Copenhagen, Denmark

Københavns Toldbod – Copenhagen Custom Tax Buildings

Københavns Frihavn – Copenhagen Freeport

The Little Mermaid

Rosenborg Castle

Christiansborg Slot – Christiansborg Castle

Christiansborg Bunker

Amalienborg Palace

Copenhagen City Hall

City Hall Square, Copenhagen

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Charlottenborg Palace

Moltke’s Mansion

The Lur Blowers Monument

Dragon Fountain, Copenhagen

House of Architectural Heritage

Copenhagen 1960s

Copenhagen, Denmark

Winter in Denmark

Tuborgflasken

King of the hill: Elephants, elegance and 170 years of Carlsberg

Thor in battle with the ‘giants’

Christianshavn, København, Danmark

Holmen

Søtorvet

Retired crane becomes luxury-retreat

The Olsen Gang’s Big Score, The Dragon House & The Gefion Fountain

University of Copenhagen Botanical Garden

Parks and open spaces in Copenhagen

Christiansborg

Kronborg – Helsingør

Rosenborg Castle

Amalienborg Palace

Frederiksborg Castle

Fredensborg Palace

Charlottenlund Palace

Bernstorff Palace and Palace Gardens

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Bregentved

Augustenborg Palace

Lerchenborg Slot

Gavnø Slot

Ledreborg

Aalholm Slot

Holckenhavn

Holsteinborg

Vallø Slot

Hvedholm Slot

Tranekær Slot

Rosenholm Slot

Koldinghus

Gråsten Palace

Borreby Castle

Rosenfeldt Manor

Basnæs

Gram Slot

Berritzgaard

Krenkerup Gods

Lykkesholm Slot

Skjoldenæsholm Slot

Herlufsholm

Sophienholm

Gyldensteen

Hørbygård

Rosengaard

Egholm

Arresødal

Fredsholm

Lindholm

Skanderborg Slot

Charlottenborg Palace

Varna Palæet

Moltke’s Mansion

Copenhagen City Hall

Valdemar’s Castle, Egeskov and Svendborg

Kronborg Castle and Helsingør Shipyard

Sønderborg Castle and Sønderborg Shipyard

Korsør Shipyard and Fortress

Hotel Koldingfjord

Værløse Air Base

More to come.

Ferdinand Vilhelm Jensen

Ferdinand Meldahl

Heinrich Wenck

Vilhelm Dahlerup

Martin Nyrop

Hack Kampmann

Emil Blichfeldt

Hermann Baagøe Storck

Ulrik Plesner

Aage Langeland-Mathiesen

Martin Borch

Johan Daniel Herholdt

Anton Rosen

Johan Schrøder

Lindholm

Lindholm is a manor house about half a kilometre south of the Roskilde-Holbæk road in Gevninge Parish, Voldborg Herred, Lejre Municipality.

The main building was built in 1730 by J.C. Krieger. Lindholm / Selsø Estates is 983.8 hectares. Lindenborg Kro also belongs to the estate.

The name Lindholm was first mentioned in 1333, when a Johannes Hviding pawns his property in Lindholm to Sankt Clara Kloster in Roskilde. Since the Reformation, there have been changing owners. In 1690 it was bought by Chief War Commissioner Gothard Braem along with the surrounding farmhouses, as well as the right of call over Gevninge and Herslev churches. After his death in 1702, he was buried with his wife and their two children in a crypt on the north side of Gevninge Church.

Since 1728, the estate has been owned by the Scheel-Plessen family.

Wikipedia

Denmark

Danish Castles

Fortifications of Copenhagen

Kastellet and the Fortification Ring, Copenhagen, Denmark

Københavns Toldbod – Copenhagen Custom Tax Buildings

Københavns Frihavn – Copenhagen Freeport

The Little Mermaid

Rosenborg Castle

Christiansborg Slot – Christiansborg Castle

Christiansborg Bunker

Amalienborg Palace

Copenhagen City Hall

City Hall Square, Copenhagen

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Charlottenborg Palace

Moltke’s Mansion

The Lur Blowers Monument

Dragon Fountain, Copenhagen

House of Architectural Heritage

Copenhagen 1960s

Copenhagen, Denmark

Winter in Denmark

Tuborgflasken

King of the hill: Elephants, elegance and 170 years of Carlsberg

Thor in battle with the ‘giants’

Christianshavn, København, Danmark

Holmen

Søtorvet

Retired crane becomes luxury-retreat

The Olsen Gang’s Big Score, The Dragon House & The Gefion Fountain

University of Copenhagen Botanical Garden

Parks and open spaces in Copenhagen

Christiansborg

Kronborg – Helsingør

Rosenborg Castle

Amalienborg Palace

Frederiksborg Castle

Fredensborg Palace

Charlottenlund Palace

Bernstorff Palace and Palace Gardens

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Bregentved

Augustenborg Palace

Lerchenborg Slot

Gavnø Slot

Ledreborg

Aalholm Slot

Holckenhavn

Holsteinborg

Vallø Slot

Hvedholm Slot

Tranekær Slot

Rosenholm Slot

Koldinghus

Gråsten Palace

Borreby Castle

Rosenfeldt Manor

Basnæs

Gram Slot

Berritzgaard

Krenkerup Gods

Lykkesholm Slot

Skjoldenæsholm Slot

Herlufsholm

Sophienholm

Gyldensteen

Hørbygård

Rosengaard

Egholm

Arresødal

Fredsholm

Skanderborg Slot

Charlottenborg Palace

Varna Palæet

Moltke’s Mansion

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Korsør Shipyard and Fortress

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More to come.

Ferdinand Vilhelm Jensen

Ferdinand Meldahl

Heinrich Wenck

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Hermann Baagøe Storck

Ulrik Plesner

Aage Langeland-Mathiesen

Martin Borch

Johan Daniel Herholdt

Anton Rosen

Johan Schrøder

Ledreborg

Ledreborg is a palatial mansion near Lejre, 12 km (7.5 mi) to the southwest of Roskilde on the Danish island of Zealand. Today’s Baroque building was completed in 1746 by Minister of State Johan Ludvig Holstein (1694–1763) who commissioned J.C. Krieger to carry out the work.

The first reference to Lejreborg is fairly recent, dating to 1523 when Otto Tinhuus owned the property under the Diocese of Copenhagen. At the time, the estate was called Udlejre and consisted of four or five farms. After the Reformation, in 1545 Lejre became a fief in its own right under the jurisdiction of Copenhagen. In 1663, the statesman Henrik Müller purchased eight farms and five houses in Lejre including Udlejre. He presented the property to his daughter Drude and her husband, statesman Thomas Finke, who built a house called Lejregård. In 1661, Udlejregård was bought by the statesman Henrik Müller who built the first Lejregård manor house. in 1739, Johan Ludvig Holstein bought the property and developed the modest building into one of the country’s finest mansions. He commissioned Johan Cornelius Krieger to extend the building to the east and west. Krieger also added a chapel and a monumental staircase designed by Jacob Fortling. In 1745, Niels Eigtved developed the interior, including the Rokoko banqueting hall, while Lauritz de Thurah decorated the inner courtyard with two pavilions and obelisk-shaped lampposts. A gatehouse was also added.

Also designed by Krieger from 1742 until the mid-1750s, the terraced Baroque park extends from the mansion down the steep slopes of the Kornerup Valley. In the wooded area to the east, the Dyrehaven was laid out in 1757–1762 with paths leading past sculptures and obelisks in line with the trends of the time. The terraced garden was completely renovated in 2004–2006 with a waterfall and fountain designed by Erik Heide who also included sculptures of Adam and Eve.

The mansion can now be rented for meetings or conferences which can be accommodated in the banqueting hall or in the spacious reworked barn. Every August since 1994, the Danish National Chamber Orchestra has held popular concerts of film music and musicals in Ledreborg Park which enjoys exceptionally good acoustics.

Wikipedia

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Varna Palæet

Moltke’s Mansion

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Valdemar’s Castle, Egeskov and Svendborg

Kronborg Castle and Helsingør Shipyard

Sønderborg Castle and Sønderborg Shipyard

Korsør Shipyard and Fortress

Hotel Koldingfjord

Værløse Air Base

More to come.

Ferdinand Vilhelm Jensen

Ferdinand Meldahl

Heinrich Wenck

Vilhelm Dahlerup

Martin Nyrop

Hack Kampmann

Emil Blichfeldt

Hermann Baagøe Storck

Ulrik Plesner

Aage Langeland-Mathiesen

Martin Borch

Johan Daniel Herholdt

Anton Rosen

Johan Schrøder

Bregentved

Bregentved dk.jpg

Bregentved is a manor house located 3 km east of Haslev on the Danish island of Zealand. It has been owned by the Moltke family since the middle of the 18th century.

Bregentved - east wing.jpg

The first known reference to Bregentved is from 1319 when King Eric VI of Denmark passed the estate to Roskilde Abbey. From the end of the 14th century the property was owned by a succession of aristocratic families, including that of Krognos in the 16th century, until 1718 when it was acquired by King Frederick IV. In the eighteenth century Bregentved was in consecutive Birks, so had separate legal jurisdiction from Haslev Sogn (parish) and old Ringsted Herred (hundred). The north wing still extant in the early 21st century was built 1731-36 by architect Lauritz de Thurah and has a black-tiled, hipped roof. It contains a chapel on the first floor.

Bregentved Castle – Haslev, Denmark.jpg

In 1746, King Frederick V granted the Bregentved estate to Adam Gottlob Moltke, one of his closest companions who was at the same time made lord chamberlain and a count. Over the next few years, Moltke adapted the two remaining wings with the assistance of the architects G.D. Anthon and Nicolai Eigtved. Moltke also commissioned Eigtved to build him a large mansion in Copenhagen, the south-western of the four Amalienborg Palaces, which was completed in 1754.

At Bregentved, Moltke introduced several agricultural reforms to the management of the estate with inspiration from Holstein.

A. G. Moltke died at Bregentved on 25 September 1792, passing his estates to his oldest son, Joachim Godske Moltke, who ceded their mansion in Copenhagen to the royal family after the fire of Christiansborg Palace in 1794. As a replacement, Adam Wilhelm Moltke, who had just left office as the first Prime Minister under Denmark’s new constitutional monarchy, acquired a new mansion which became known as Moltke’s Mansion. After the harvests at Bregentved Manor and other family holdings, he would move his entire household to Copenhagen.

In the 1880s, Count Frederik Christian Moltke decided to modernize the house. He demolished the two Eigtved wings and replaced them with two new wings which were completed in 1891 to the design of the architect Axel Berg.

Bregentved from bridge.jpg

The main east wing and the south wing of the present three-winged building date from Axel Berg’s 1891 rebuilding and stand on Eigtved’s foundations. They are designed in the Neo-Rococo style and are topped by a Mansard roof in copper and tile. The east wing has a three-bay risalit with pilasters and a triangular pediment, and a two-bay corner risilit at each end with segmental pediments. The entrance tower also dates from Berg’s expansion.

The north wing was built 1731-36 by Lauritz de Thurah and has a black-tiled, hipped roof. It contains a chapel on the first floor which has sculptor Johann Friedrich Hännel.

Bregentved.jpg

In the 1760s, A. G. Moltke commissioned Nicolas-Henri Jardin to create a garden in the French formal garden style but it was adapted into a landscape garden in 1835. Some features have been retained from Jardin’s garden, including avenues, and traces of a parterre surrounded by canals and a system of fountains, which was restored in 1994. Some vases and Frederik V’s Obelisk (1770) by Johannes Wiedewelt also date from this garden as does a copy of a statue by Giambologna. The garden also features a statue of A. W. Moltke by Herman Wilhelm Bissen in 1858-59.

Bregentved-Turebyholm covers 6,338 hectares of which just over half consist of agricultural land and the rest of forest. A total of 163 houses also belongs to the estate, including Turebylille, Holtegård, Eskilstrup, Rødehus, Sofiendal, Sprettingegård, Storelinde Overdrevsgård, Ulsegård and Statafgård. The estate maintains a staff of 40 and has a yearly turnover of approximately DKK 60 million. Apart from agriculture and forestry, the revenues derive from house rental, hiring-out of hunting areas, hiring-out of storage facilities and machine pool services.

There is no public access to the house but the park is open to the public on Wednesdays, Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays. Admission is free of charge.

Bregentved – Wikipedia

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King of the hill: Elephants, elegance and 170 years of Carlsberg

Thor in battle with the ‘giants’

Christianshavn, København, Danmark

Holmen

Søtorvet

Retired crane becomes luxury-retreat

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Aalholm Slot

Holckenhavn

Holsteinborg

Vallø Slot

Hvedholm Slot

Tranekær Slot

Rosenholm Slot

Koldinghus

Gråsten Palace

Borreby Castle

Rosenfeldt Manor

Basnæs

Gram Slot

Berritzgaard

Krenkerup Gods

Lykkesholm Slot

Skjoldenæsholm Slot

Herlufsholm

Sophienholm

Gyldensteen

Hørbygård

Rosengaard

Egholm

Arresødal

Fredsholm

Skanderborg Slot

Charlottenborg Palace

Varna Palæet

Moltke’s Mansion

Copenhagen City Hall

Valdemar’s Castle, Egeskov and Svendborg

Kronborg Castle and Helsingør Shipyard

Sønderborg Castle and Sønderborg Shipyard

Korsør Shipyard and Fortress

Hotel Koldingfjord

Værløse Air Base

More to come.

Ferdinand Vilhelm Jensen

Ferdinand Meldahl

Heinrich Wenck

Vilhelm Dahlerup

Martin Nyrop

Hack Kampmann

Emil Blichfeldt

Hermann Baagøe Storck

Ulrik Plesner

Aage Langeland-Mathiesen

Martin Borch

Johan Daniel Herholdt

Anton Rosen

Holsteinborg Castle

Holsteingborg (Sjælland).JPG

Holsteinborg Castle is a manor house located 12 kilometres southeast of SkælskørSlagelse MunicipalityDenmark. It was built in the first half of the 17th century by members of the Trolle family, who gave it the name Trolholm, but has been owned by the Holstein family since 1707. Hans Christian Andersen was a frequent visitor to the estate in the middle of the 19th century. The main building is situated close to the coast, overlooking Holsteinborg Nor, a shallow watered cove which is almost closed off from the Småland Sea and Great Belt by Glænø, Glænø Stenfed and Glænø Østerfed.

Holsteinborg Slot - panoramio.jpg

A fortification was in about 1200 built approximately at the site of the current castle to guard Bisserup Harbour, then a naval support point. The estate is referred to as Bråde in 1357 when it is owned by Roskilde bishopric. The property was confiscated by the Crown 1536 in connection with the Reformation.

Architecture

The oldest part of the four-winged manor house is the west wing which was built by Børge Trolle in 1598. The three other wings were built between 1538 and 1546. The building was adapted in 1777-81 by G.E. Rosenberg and again in 1848-50 bu Gustav Friedrich Hetsch. The original Renaissance castle now combines Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque and Neoclassical elements. The main gate is located in the north wing which is flanked by corner towers with spires from 1642 and 1649. The two headless shieldbearers that flank the gate represent the headless troll in the Trolle family’s coat of arms. The moat is only preserved on the north side and around the farm buildings, some of which date from the middle of the 17th century.

Surroundings

The estate comprises Fuirendal and Snedinge and has a total area of 1,486 hectares of which 546 are forest.

The southern part of the park is an English style landscape garden from 1865 and 1892. The northern part of the park retains elements of an earlier Baroque garden from 1725, including a 2 km long lime tree avenue.

Read more here: Holsteinborg Castle – Wikipedia

Denmark

Danish Castles

Fortifications of Copenhagen

Kastellet and the Fortification Ring, Copenhagen, Denmark

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The Little Mermaid

Rosenborg Castle

Christiansborg Slot – Christiansborg Castle

Christiansborg Bunker

Amalienborg Palace

Copenhagen City Hall

City Hall Square, Copenhagen

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Charlottenborg Palace

Moltke’s Mansion

The Lur Blowers Monument

Dragon Fountain, Copenhagen

House of Architectural Heritage

Copenhagen 1960s

Copenhagen, Denmark

Winter in Denmark

Tuborgflasken

King of the hill: Elephants, elegance and 170 years of Carlsberg

Thor in battle with the ‘giants’

Christianshavn, København, Danmark

Holmen

Søtorvet

Retired crane becomes luxury-retreat

The Olsen Gang’s Big Score, The Dragon House & The Gefion Fountain

University of Copenhagen Botanical Garden

Parks and open spaces in Copenhagen

Christiansborg

Kronborg – Helsingør

Rosenborg Castle

Amalienborg Palace

Frederiksborg Castle

Fredensborg Palace

Charlottenlund Palace

Bernstorff Palace and Palace Gardens

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Augustenborg Palace

Lerchenborg Slot

Gavnø Slot

Aalholm Slot

Holckenhavn

Vallø Slot

Hvedholm Slot

Tranekær Slot

Rosenholm Slot

Koldinghus

Gråsten Palace

Borreby Castle

Rosenfeldt Manor

Basnæs

Gram Slot

Berritzgaard

Krenkerup Gods

Lykkesholm Slot

Skjoldenæsholm Slot

Herlufsholm

Sophienholm

Gyldensteen

Hørbygård

Rosengaard

Egholm

Arresødal

Fredsholm

Skanderborg Slot

Charlottenborg Palace

Varna Palæet

Moltke’s Mansion

Copenhagen City Hall

Valdemar’s Castle, Egeskov and Svendborg

Kronborg Castle and Helsingør Shipyard

Sønderborg Castle and Sønderborg Shipyard

Korsør Shipyard and Fortress

Hotel Koldingfjord

Værløse Air Base

More to come.

Ferdinand Vilhelm Jensen

Ferdinand Meldahl

Heinrich Wenck

Vilhelm Dahlerup

Martin Nyrop

Hack Kampmann

Emil Blichfeldt

Hermann Baagøe Storck

Ulrik Plesner

Aage Langeland-Mathiesen

Martin Borch

Johan Daniel Herholdt

Anton Rosen

Rosenfeldt Manor

Jrb 20050309 Rosenfeldt gods 001.JPG

Rosenfeldt Manor is a manor house located just west of VordingborgDenmark. The estate was founded in 1774 but the current main building was built in 1870 to a design by Henrik Steffens Sibbern.

Rosenfeldt Manor.jpg

The estate was founded by Baron Reinhard von Iselin, a prosperous, Swiss-born landowner, who in 1774 acquired the land when the Crown sold Vordingborg Cavalry District in auction. From 1776 to 1777 he constructed a large farm complex around an octagonal courtyard with the assistance of the architect Christian Joseph Zuber.

Iselin’s daughter, Anna Elizabeth, inherited Rosenfeldt in 1781. In 1777 she had married the French-born nobleman Antoine de Bosc de la Calmette who in 1783 was appointed prefect of Møn where he owned Marienborg and founded the Liselund estate which he named after his wife.

In 1844 the estate was acquired by captain, general-major Oscar O’Neill Oxholm. He lived on the estate with his Irish wife Adelaide Maria O´Kelly. Oxholm constructed the new main building, two farm buildings and 20 fæstegårde. Designed by Henrik Steffens Sibbern, the main building was built from 1868 to 1870.

Architecture

Rosenfeldt’s buildings are arranged around seven of eight sides of Zuber’s octagonal courtyard, a layout which is remniscient of that of Amalienborg in Copenhagen. Zuber’s original farm complex consists of four low pavilions and two tall stable buildings in Neoclassical style. The plan also reserved a site for the main building which was not built until 1870. Sibbern’s main building is constructed in red brick and designed in a Neo-Renaissance style. It consists of a two-story main wing with a tower flanked by two short lateral wings.

Rosenfeldt Manor today

Rosenfeldt Manor is owned by Peter Oxholm Tillisch. It covers 2,313 hectares (1998).

Rosenfeldt – Wikipedia

Zealand 2017-04-30 (34316217874).jpg

Denmark

Danish Castles

Fortifications of Copenhagen

Kastellet and the Fortification Ring, Copenhagen, Denmark

Københavns Toldbod – Copenhagen Custom Tax Buildings

Københavns Frihavn – Copenhagen Freeport

The Little Mermaid

Rosenborg Castle

Christiansborg Slot – Christiansborg Castle

Christiansborg Bunker

Amalienborg Palace

Copenhagen City Hall

City Hall Square, Copenhagen

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Charlottenborg Palace

Moltke’s Mansion

The Lur Blowers Monument

Dragon Fountain, Copenhagen

House of Architectural Heritage

Copenhagen 1960s

Copenhagen, Denmark

Winter in Denmark

Tuborgflasken

King of the hill: Elephants, elegance and 170 years of Carlsberg

Thor in battle with the ‘giants’

Christianshavn, København, Danmark

Holmen

Søtorvet

Retired crane becomes luxury-retreat

The Olsen Gang’s Big Score, The Dragon House & The Gefion Fountain

University of Copenhagen Botanical Garden

Parks and open spaces in Copenhagen

Christiansborg

Kronborg – Helsingør

Rosenborg Castle

Amalienborg Palace

Frederiksborg Castle

Fredensborg Palace

Charlottenlund Palace

Bernstorff Palace and Palace Gardens

Frederiksberg Palace, Frederiksberg City Hall / Command Central

Augustenborg Palace

Lerchenborg Slot

Gavnø Slot

Aalholm Slot

Holckenhavn

Vallø Slot

Hvedholm Slot

Tranekær Slot

Rosenholm Slot

Koldinghus

Gråsten Palace

Borreby Castle

Basnæs

Gram Slot

Berritzgaard

Krenkerup Gods

Lykkesholm Slot

Skjoldenæsholm Slot

Herlufsholm

Sophienholm

Gyldensteen

Hørbygård

Rosengaard

Egholm

Arresødal

Fredsholm

Skanderborg Slot

Charlottenborg Palace

Varna Palæet

Moltke’s Mansion

Copenhagen City Hall

Valdemar’s Castle, Egeskov and Svendborg

Kronborg Castle and Helsingør Shipyard

Sønderborg Castle and Sønderborg Shipyard

Korsør Shipyard and Fortress

Hotel Koldingfjord

Værløse Air Base

More to come.

Ferdinand Vilhelm Jensen

Ferdinand Meldahl

Heinrich Wenck

Vilhelm Dahlerup

Martin Nyrop

Hack Kampmann

Emil Blichfeldt

Hermann Baagøe Storck

Ulrik Plesner

Aage Langeland-Mathiesen

Martin Borch

Johan Daniel Herholdt

Anton Rosen